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Full text of "The International Studio /June 1915"

VOL. LV 



JUNE 1915 



No. 220 



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JOHN LANE COMPANY 

116-120 West Thirty Second Street 

NEW YORK 

Monthly • 50 cts. 





Yearly Subscription, 



$5 



oo 



Post padd 












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June, 1915 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 





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ITO 





WELCOME 



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Am Exhibition of 



Paimiti 




<e> 



by 

American Artiste 



THE PUFF OF SMOKE {Art Institute of Chicago) 

{An illustration from "Biographical Notes") GIFFORD BEAL 

HP HE life and work of fifty of our leading American painters, 
* accompanied in each case by the reproduction of a 
typical canvas, are summarized in our new reference book- 
let, "Biographical Notes," 105 pages, 5 in. x 8 in., price 
50 cents, postpaid. 



will remain on view during the summer 
months for the benefit and enjoyment 
of the many art lovers who visit New 
York in the vacation season. 

Interested visitors are always wel- 
come, whether or not they come to buy 
pictures. 



WILI 




MACBETH 



450 FIFT 





NUE 



(at Fortieth Street) 




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MOULTON <®, RICKETTS 



INCORPORATED 



PAINTINGS 



OF THE 















Old and Modern Schools 



71-75 EAST VAN BUREN STREET 



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TIFFANY 




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EXCLUSIVE DESIGNS 
IN COLD AND SILVER 
WHICH CANNOT BE OB- 
TAINED ELSEWHERE 



NEW YORK • PARIS 

LONDON 



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THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



June, 1915 










OSAKA 
LONDON 



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KIOTO 
BOSTON 



Shipping Offers: SHANGHAI, PEKIW, 



YAMANAKA & CO 

254 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 




The Beautiful Home for Birds 
Decorated with Jade and Ivory Ornaments 

WORKS OF ART FROM THE 





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FOSTER 
BROTHERS 



MEDICI PRINTS 

Reproductions in Color 
After the Old Masters 

Illustrated Catalogue sent on 

request 



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BOSTON 



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FRINK PICTURE LIGHTING 

Oyer go per cent, of the Art Galleries in the 
United States are illuminated by the Frink 
System of Lighting. This is conclusive proof 
of the superiority of this method of lighting 
*\iV er L es ' P' ctures . book-cases, etc. 

We have made a special study of lighting of 
every kind and description for more than half 
-1 century, and guarantee satisfaction. 

WRITE FOK CATALOG 

H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 

SOLE SELLING AGENTS FOR FRINK PRODUCTS 

New York and All Large Cities 



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ORIGINATORS, DESIGNERS and MAKERS OF 

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FACTORY: State and Kinzie Streets, CHICAGO 

rrff f A^'EJfSKy.? AND ARTISTIC SPANISH. 
K^y A e N ii£?£S CH AND ENGLISH PERIOD 
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Catalogues sent to Artists and Dealers 

EXHIBITION FRAMES A SPECIALTY 

Exclusive STANFORD WHITE Designs 

Established Forty Y 7 ears 



June, 1915 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



The 



International Studio 



Edited by CHARLES HOLME Ambeican Pages, CV to CXXXIII Inclusivb,and Articles on Adveetising Pages Edited by W. H db B NELSON 

Registered at U. S. Patent Office Copyright, 1015, by John Lane Co. Entered at N. Y. Post Office as Second-Class Matter 



Plates 



CONTENTS, JUNE, 1915 



PAGE 



SIR ANTHONY VANDYCR 

Oil Painting 
Queen Henrietta Maria 

Frontispiece 



G. F. WATTS, R.A 

Oil Painting 

The Creation of Eve 

Page 23S 



THE SAN DIEGO AND SAN FRANCISCO EXPOSITIONS: I— SAN DIEGO 

By Christian Brinton. cv 

Six Illustrations. 



ALBERT PHILIPPE ROLL 

Five Illustrations. 

THE CITY COLLEGE STADIUM 

Three Illustrations. 



By Paul Vitry cxi 



By Dr. John H. Finley . . . cxvi 



it 



LA MIDINETTE" BY ALBERT ROSENTHAL 



exx 



THE EDMUND DAVIS COLLECTION 



Sixteen Illustrations. 



(SECOND ARTICLE) 

By T. Martin Wood 



229 



G. F. WATTS, R.A 

Oil Painting 
Denunciation 

Page 239 



AN ENGLISH ARTIST'S IMPRESSIONS OF NEW YORK 

By William Monk, R.E. 247 

Twelve Illustrations. 



EUGENE BOUDIN 

Oil Painting 
La Plage 

Facing page 2 1 ; 



WILLIAM MONK, R.E 

Water Colour 

New York from the Sound 

Facing page 250 



BELGIAN ARTISTS IN ENGLAND (THIRD ARTICLE) 

By Dr. P. Buschmann 

Thirteen Illustrations. 

THE MODERN DEVELOPMENT OF OIL PAINTING IN JAPAN 

By Prof. Jiro Harada.. 

Thirteen Illustrations. 

■ 

STUDIO TALK (From Our Own Correspondents) 

Twenty-two Illustrations. 

ART SCHOOL NOTES: BIRMINGHAM 

Eight Illustrations. 



260 



270 



278 



296 



REVIEWS AND NOTICES 298 



THE LAY FIGURE: ON THE OFFICIAL PORTRAIT 
THE PASSING SHOW 

Twenty-one Illustrations. 

IN THE GALLERIES 

■ 

Five Illustrations. 



300 



By W. H. de B. Nelson exxi 



CXXXlll 



Published monthly. 50 cents per copy. $5.00 a year. Canadian Postage 60 cents, foreign postage, $1.44 additional 



W. SCOTT THURBER ART GALLERIES 

408 South Michigan Boulevard, CHICAGO 

Paintings Fine Etchings Modern Original Color Prints 



Mezzotints 



Proper Framing Expert Restoring 



(fcOur collections are very complete and comprehensive, chosen solely for artistic excel- 
lence and originality and sold at the lowest prices commensurate with their quality. 
dL We also have manv pictures suitable for schools and homes st- v^v lr,™ ™^c 



3 










4 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



June, 1915 I June, wis 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



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OOD pictures deserve good frames 
presentation being our life stucr?, 
it is natural for us to do better framing 
than is generally offered. 

We snail be pleased to give you our 
assistance and advice. 

THE EHRICH GALLERIES 



Paintings and their proper 



707 Fifth Avenue, N. 

"<§ih HUwtrra" 

Exclusively 



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Your old Family Daguerreotypes 



Also old faded photographs, tintypes, miniatures, 
oil paintings and other family portraits 

reproduced privately in 




for gifts to your relatives, and for preservation in case of loss, 

damage or fading of originals. 

This cut of Major Henry L. HiGGlNSON is from a 
Copley Print from an old photograph taken in 185?. 

CIRCULAR SENT ON REQUEST 

Complete Illustrated Catalogue of Thk Copley Prints for general gifts 
(practically a Handbook of American Art) sent for 25 cents (stamps). 

CURTIS <& CAMERON, 71 Harcourt St, BOSTON 

Salesroom: Pierce Building, opposite Public Library 



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BERLIN PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPANY 

305 Madison Ave., bet. 41st and 42d Sts. 

New York City 

Finest Reproductions in Color, 
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Illustrated Supplementary Catalogue of 
Old Masters — 10 cents 



HILL TOLERTON 

THE PRINT ROOMS 

HIGH •CLASS ENGRAVINGS AND 

ETCHINGS 





ExclMsire designs In the original colon. 
10 x 24. Send for Illustrated catalog**- 

WM.T. SHEPHERD, Sales Afsnt,Evsnsten,lll. 



GJLANT AVENUE 



FRANCISCO 



The Prop 



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From Antique, Medieval and Modern 

Masterpieces of Art 

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113 East 34th Street. New York 



Harper's Magazine 



for it is in Harper's Magazine that you 
find the announcements of more 
private and preparatory schools and 
colleges than in any other publica- 
tion — the widest, the best, and the 
most dependable selection. 



Would von not like to have your man 

child go to school with children whose 
parents read Harper's Magazine f 




THE CONCEPTION OF ART 



By HENRY R. POORE, author of "Pictorial Composition " Putnam* "rw «f ♦. . .- , , 

of the year." "The most notable of recent contributions to the suh£?t . if T 081 . 11 " 1 ?^ books 

mmzting."-Phila. Inquirer. "Artist student and layman wilf several y find it Wh° Yi ly 'K S , ingul 3 r !?. iUu " 
n*t\n g ."-Chica g o Herald. Sent by HENRY MALKAN. 42 ZaTway'^v" 'l&^JreS!^ ^So." 




STATUETTE OF THE MINOAN 
SNAKE GODDESS (GIFT OF 
MRS. \V. SCOTT FITZ) 



Excavations carried on in the island of 
Crete during the last fifteen years have 
furnished the materials for an entirely new 
chapter in the history of the ancient world. 
We now know that throughout the third 
and second millenia before Christ Crete 
was the centre of a continuous and highly 
developed civilization, the existence of 
which had been barely suspected before. 
The course of its political history can only 
be guessed at from the ruins of its towns 
and palaces, from a few references in con- 
temporary Egyptian records, and from 
vague traditions handed down to the 
Greeks of historic times. The Cretans 
were a seafaring people, controlling the 
commerce of the /Egean; they lived in 
unfortified towns and were able for the 
most part to develop the arts of peace un- 
disturbed. The climax of their civiliza- 
tion, to be dated about 1500 B.C., is best 
illustrated by the great palace at Knossos 
and the rich finds made in it. From the 
name of its legendary king, Minos, the 
whole prehistoric age of Crete has been 
called "Minoan." Not long after 1500 B.C. 
Knossos was destroyed and the centre of 
power shifted to Mycenae, Tiryns and other 
strongholds on the Greek mainland, whose 
rulers, though in part, at least, of a differ- 
ent race, maintained a close connection 
with the older island civilization. The 
best of the works of art which have been 
found in the shaft graves at Mycenae and 
on other "Mycenaean " sites are clearly the 
products of Minoan artists. Finally, as a 
result of repeated inroads from the north, 
culminating in the series of events known 
as the Dorian Invasion, this civilization 
was entirely destroyed. Faint echoes of 
its past splendour are preserved in the 
Homeric poems, and it has been suggested 
that the tale of the lost Atlantis, told to 
Solon by Egyptian priests, referred to 
Minoan Crete. Its ruins, however, did 
not sink beneath the sea, but were merely 
covered by a few feet of earth and thus pre- 
served for the archaeologist of the twentieth 
century. As a result, we of the present 
day know far more about this prehistoric 
race, their personal appearance and dress, 
their mode of life and their art, than did the 
Greeks of the classic period, who were their 
successors and in part their descendants.* 

Minoan art has hitherto been repre- 
sented in the Museum by a small collection 
of pottery, some seal-stones and a few gold 
ornaments, a necklace of blue glass pen- 
dants and a remarkable series of vases in 
variegated marble and alabaster, breccia 
and steatite. To these has now been 
added, as a gift from Mrs. W. Scott Fitz, a 
work which, it is safe to say, would be 
accorded a place of honour even among the 
treasures of the Candia Museum or in the 
Mycenaean Room of the National Museum 
at Athens. It is a statuette of the Minoan 
Snake Goddess, six and one-half inches in 
height, carved in ivory and richly deco- 
rated with gold. 

The body was made in two pieces, the 
joint running across the skirt between the 
first and second bands; the arms, also, were 
carved separately and attached. The 

♦The recent discoveries in Crete have been ad- 
mirably described in a little book by C. H. and H. 
B. Hawes, entitled "Crete, the Forerunner of 
Greece. 



ART SCHOOLS— SUMMER CLASSES AND REGULAR COURSES 



NEW YORK 



NEW YORK SCHOOL OF 
APPLIED DESIGN for WOMEN 

Incorporated 1892 



^£k 



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Wall-Paper and 
Book-Covet Designing ; 
Fashion Drawing, His- 
toric Ornament, Conven- 
tionalization. Architec- 
ture. Headquarter* for 
Women Students, Society 
Beaux -Arts Architects, 
Antique, Life, Costume 
and Fashion Classes. 

160-162 LEXINGTON AVENUE 













TROY SCHOOL 
of ARTS and CRAFTS 

{Incorporated by the llegenti 
of the State of New York) 

Broadway, TROY, NEW YORK 

Instruction in the Arts and Crafts under 
Trained Specialists. 

Cast Drawing, Drawing and Painting from 
Costume Models, Illustrations, Compositions, 
Anatomy, Decorative Design, Oil, Water Color 
and Pastel, China Painting. 

Wood Carving, Leather Carving, Metal Work, 
Weaving, Bookbinding, Modeling, Basket and 
Lace Making, Stenciling, Embroidery. 
Diplomas and Certificates Send for Catalogue 

EMILIE C. ADAMS, Director 



COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 

Four-year course in Painting leading to the degree 
of B. P. Three-year certificate course in Design. 
Special course in Illustration. Prizes; graduate fel- 
lowship entitling holder to a year's study abroad. 
Special students may enter at any time. For bulle- 
tin and information address Registrar, Syracuse 
University, Syracuse, N. Y. 



Southampton Summer School of Art 

AT SOUTHAMPTON, L. I. 

Under the Direction of MARSHAL FRY 

Six Weeks, July 6 to August 17 

Landscape Painting out of doors, Design and its 
application to Illustration, Interior Decoration and 
various handicrafts. For circulars address 

Marshal Fry, 600 West 192d St., New York City 



C. F. HAMANN 

Instructor in JEWELRY. ENAMELING and 

SILVERS MITHING at 
PRATT INSTITUTE, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Will have a SUMMER SCHOOL, during the 
months of JULY and AUGUST, at 

LAKE RONKONKOMA, LONG ISLAND 

For terms address Mr. Hamann 
943 East 37th Street, Brooklyn 



Elverhoj Summer School of 
Painting and Craftsmanship 

MILTON -ON -HUDSON, NEW YORK 

PAINTING, ETCHING, CRAFTSWORK, 

BATHING, BOATING 
JUNE 15 TO SEPTEMBER 15 

G. Glenn Newell School of Painting— Landscape, 

animal and life study in the open, and studio work 

John Morton School of Metal Craft — Regular 
study in Design, and most advanced work in pre- 
cious metals, enamels, etc. 

Ralph M. Pearson School of Etching — Regular 
course in etching including all its technical processes 

The Elverhoj Colony with its famous sketching 

grounds of Geo. Inness offers great opportunities 

for the study of art under ideal conditions 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 



Your Opportunity for Rest and Study 



Permanent Summer School 




Susan F. Bissell, Secretary 



Belle Terre, Long Island 

New York School of 
Fine and Applied Art 

Frank Alvah Parsons, President 

Send for prospectus giving de- 
tails of our expansion for sum- 
mer instruction. Ten depts. 

2239 Broadway, New York City 



n 



] 



THE FRENCH SCHOOL of 
FASHION ILLUSTRATING 

and COMMERCIAL ART gives a complete 
training in Fashion Drawing of every descrip- 
tion, color, composition, and all branches of the 
Commercial Arts. 

Studtnts fitted for Positions 

C*fT*«pondenoe Course if desired. WrlU for particulars 

Miss M. Weidenmu, Director, 127 W. 42d St., New York 



PRATT INSTITUTE 
ART SCHOOL 

BROOKLYN, N1W YORK 

Applied Design, Interior Decoration, Jewelry. Sllvsr- 
ttnlthlnfi. Life, Portrait. Composition. Costume Illustra- 
tion, Commercial Design, Oil and Water Color Painting. 

Architecture — Two-and-Three-Year Courses. 
Normal Art and Manual Training — Two- Year Courses. 

tO Rooms ; 46 Instructor. ; 28th Year 
WALTER SCOTT PERRY, Director 




BLUE DOME FRAT 

DEWING WOODWARD, President 

A School for Painting the Figure in the Landscape. Instruction based upon Laws of Beauty and 
Coherence. Also an Association of Experienced Artists for Mutual Benefit. Lectures by Eminent Men 
and Women. EveryFacility — Beautiful Grounds, Spacious Studio, Comfortable Inn. June to October. 
Address inquiries to the Secretary, LOUISE JOHNSON, Shady, Ulster County, New York. 



The Art Students' League 

New York 

No. 215 West Fifty-Seventh Street 



•Sch 

Landscape Painting 

at Woodstock 

Ulster Co., New York 



City Summer School 



215 West 57th Street 



under 



Mr. John F. Carlson 
June 1 to Nov. 1 



Mr. George B. Bridgman 

Special Classes for Children under 

Sixteen 

June 1 to Sept. 25 



CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION 






K 






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■ 



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■ I 



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6 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 






) 





— 



June, IQ15 J unef 1QI5 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



CONNECTICUT 



YALE SCHOOL OF THE FINE ARTS 

YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

WM. SERGEANT KENDALL, Director 

Faculty Painting— Professor Kendall. Drawing— Asst. Professor Edwin C. Taylor, George H. 
Langzettel. Sculpture — Lee 0. Lawrie. Architecture — Richard H. Dana, Jr. Anatomy — Raynham 
lownshend, M.D. Classes in Composition and Perspective. 

Winchester Foreign Fellowship, English Foreign Scholarship and School Scholarships. 

For illustrated catalogue and information address George H. Langzettel, Secretary 






WESTPORT SUMMER ART CLASS 



CONDUCTED BY 



OSSIP L. LINDE 

For Circulars Address 

OSSIP L. LINDE, Westport, Conn. 



ART OUT OF DOORS 

H. R. POORE, A.N. A. 

formerly of the 
Chautauqua Art School 

Penn. Academy Fine Arts 

Author"Pict. Composition" 

"Conception of* Art," etc. 

Daily criticisms, field and ^___ 

studio, landscape and figure. "Boxwood," H«dqu»rt«i of. CI 

Full descriftivt circular, address LYME, CONN. 




COLORADO 



The Fine Arts Academy of Denver 

Drawlnir— Paintlnfl— Design— Modeling— Illustration 

Special Normal Art Course In Summer Term 

ABIGAIL HOLM AN, Director 



MAINE 



Rest, Recreation and Study at Boothbay Harbor, on the Coast of Maine 

COMMONWEALTH ART COLONY 

SSffiSfSM Hon ie cooking . F o r further particulars see March, 

502 Broadway^ PROvfl]«NCE7R. L ' ma ^zme, and send lor catalog. A. G. RANDALL, 



SUMMER SCHOOL OF GRAPHIC ART 

OGUNQUIT, MAINE 

Reopens June 28th. Life class in the studio on 
the seashore and in the pine woods. Classes in 
landscape painting and wood-carving. As in the 
past, the student will be encouraged in everv wav 
to express his own individuality. 

HAMILTON EASTER FIELD, Director 
OGUNQUIT MAINE 



SIXTH SUMMER SESSION 

The Clarence H. White School of 

Modern Photography 

Seguinland (P. O. Five Islands), Me. 

From July 5 to August 14 

For information, address CLARENCE H WHITE 

230 East I 1 th Street, New York' 



PENNSYLVANIA 



School of Industrial Art 

OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

BROAD AND PINE STREETS, PHILADELPHIA 

Thorough work under trained specialists 
in all branches of Fine and Industrial Art 

Special provision for classes in Illustration, Archi- 
tecture, Decorative Painting and Sculpture, Pottery 
Metal Work, Industrial Design, Textile Design and 
Manufacture. L. W. MILLER, Principal. 





Dro;xd &nd Pine Streets a a Vh&\ch\vWi T. 

-fltstiieties -HistoricArt • fruieiples zutd fWrke _. 

De5i^.r>a^in^.Color.NotnraUi^Methodd 
for terms and further- particulars addrcss- 

* Otto rrcdctndt Hge- Instructor in cliAige -** 



DE LAWARE 




THE NEW SCHOOL OF ART 

ARDEN, DELAWARE 
OPENS JULY 5— SESSION FIVE WEEKS 

Athos Casarini, Artist-MABEL K. Hatt, Illustrator-SYLviA S Post Mp,,I 
\\ orker- Walter L. White, Art Instructor, N. Y. C. High School's 

Do you want the latest and best in art and art education? Come to Ardcn and 
spend a profitable and enjoyable vacation. Write for booklet and rates 

WALTER L. WHITE ?6 Hart Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 






ivory, though in a fairly sound condition, is 
badly split and warped, and the lower part 
of the dress on the right side is missing. 
This has been restored in wax, giving the 
figure stability and making it possible to 
replace the gold bands of the skirt. The 
left arm, with the band around it and the 
snake, is intact. A second band and the 
forepart of a second snake are preserved, 
together with a few small fragments of the 
left arm. This arm and the portion of th« 
snake coiled around it have been restored, 
the former in plaster, the latter in lead, 
plated with gold. The whole figure has 
been filled with a solution of paraffin, to 
preserve it against further disintegration. 
The goddess stands proudly, with her 
arms held out to the front, and each hand 
vigorously grasping a gold snake which 
coils itself about the forearm. She is 
crowned with an elaborate tiara, whose 
edge curves up in semi-circular form at the 
front, back and sides, while a small cylin- 
drical piece rises in the centre. Each of 
the four semi-circular plaques is pierced 
near the top for the attachment of an orna- 
ment, and a drill hole at the back shows 
that the head-dress was encircled by a gold 
band. Above the forehead is a row of 
seven deeply drilled holes, which, on the 
analogy of other ivory heads found at 
Knossos, held the ends of gold curls. A 
number of frescoes show that such loose 
tendrils floating about the forehead were a 
feature of the Minoan lady's coiffure. Be- 
hind, the hair falls in a mass of wavy locks 
upon the shoulders. The face is rather 
long, narrowing toward the firm chin; 
drilled holes represent the pupils of the 
eyes. The whole expression is wonderfullv 
keen and lifelike. She wears the charac- 
teristic Minoan dress, consisting of a tight- 
fitting jacket cut so low in front as to 
entirely expose the breasts, a full skirt with 
five plaited flounces, and an apron. The 
Minoan bodice resembled that worn by 
peasant women in many parts of Europe 
to-day, but differed in that it extended up 
to the neck behind and was furnished with 
short, tight-fitting sleeves. Three nails, 
which held in place the small vertical strip 
of gold in front, represented the fastenings 
of this bodice. One of these nails held, 
also, the ends of gold bands, now lost, 
which passed around the breasts and up to 
the sides of the neck, marking the edge of 
the jacket. 

The bands around the upper arms are 
not armlets, but the embroidered hems 
of the sleeves. A hole at the base of the 
neck in front served to attach a neck- 
lace. The slender waist is confined by a 
broad, concave hoop of gold. Five gold 
bands which decorated the hems of the 
flounces of the skirt are fortunately pre- 
served, but, owing to the splitting of 
the ivory, the three lower ones no longer 
reach completely around it. They in- 
crease gradually in width from top to bot- 
tom, and each has a different incised pat- 
tern. Three pairs of holes in front, be- 
tween the girdle and the hem of the first 
flounce, give the outline of a narrow apron. 
Ine surface enclosed by these holes is 
smooth, whereas the flounce on either side 
shows minute horizontal folds. Though 
no traces of paint are preserved, it is likely 
that the apron had a different colour from 
that of the skirt, and that the jacket was 
similarly distinguished from the adjoining 
flesh parts. 






PAINTING 

ILLUSTRATION 

AND DESIGN 

VESPER LINCOLN GEORGE 
DOUGLAS JOHN CONNAH 
HELEN CHASE BUSH 
JESSIE LANE BURBANK 
JOHN WEEKS, JR. 
HAROLD G. McMENNAMIN 

Reasons Why You Should Select 

THE NEW SCHOOL OF BOSTON 

THE INSTRUCTORS have had years of ex- 
perience in teaching. 

THEY ARE practical workers in the subjects 
they teach. 

THEIR PUPILS are occupying lucrative posi- 
tions throughout the Tinted States. 

THE SCHOOL occupies a fine, new, fireproof 
building, with every modern convenience. 

THE RATES are moderate. 

Winter Term. Sept. 6. 1915. to June 30, 1916 

CONNAH SUMMER CLASS 

From July 5 to August 28, 1915 

at beautiful OLD PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 

Write for circulars to 

THE NEW SCHOOL 

248 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 




Boston, Massachusetts 40th year begins Sept. 27th 

SCHOOL OF THE 
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 

. nstructors. Drawing and Painting- Frank W. Benson, 
Philip L. Hale, F. A. Bosley, W. James, L. P. Thompson! 
R. McLellan; Modeling— B. L. Pratt; Design— H. Elliott, 
H. H. Clark, G.J. Hunt. Prizes, Scholarships and Traveling 
Scholarships* For list of prizes won and of positions held by 
past pupils of school and for circular, address 

ALICE F. BROOKS, Manager. 



ART MUSEUM SCHOOL 

SALISBURY HOUSE WORCESTER. MASS. 

H. Stuart Michie, Principal 

DESIGN METAL WORK 

DRAWING POTTERY 

PAINTING WOOD CARVING 

BOOKBINDING MODELING 

Prospectus on Application 

MISSB. C.UPHAM, CLERK 



THE FOUNDATIONS OF THE 
NINETEENTH CENTURY 

By Houston Stewart Chamberlain. 

A translation from the German by 

John Lees. With an introduction by 

Lord Redesdale. New popular-priced 

edition. Two volumes. 8vo. Cloth. 
$5.00 net. 

One of the most stimulating and important 
books written in the last twenty years. Mr. 
Chamberlain has something new to say on such 
subjects as the Renaissance, the meaning of 
religion, evolution, the question of race, impor- 
tance of nations, and the part played by the 
teutonic peoples in the history of the world. 

Theodore Roosevelt in The Outlook.-* 

I Ins is a noteworthy book in more ways than 

one. . . I have called the book 'noteworthy ' 

and this it certainly is. It ranks with Buckle's 

History of Civilisation, 1 and still more with 

Gobineau s Tnegalite des Races Humaines ' " 



JOHN LANE CO., NEW YORK 



7 



MASSACHUSETTS 



I 




CAPE COD SCHOOL of ART 

CHARLES W. HAWTHORNE, Instructor. Provincetown. Mass. 

1 6th Season opens July 5th 
For information address HARRY N. CAMPBELL, Provincetown, Mass. 



MARTHA'S VINEYARD 

SCHOOL OF ART 

VINEYARD HAVEN, MASS. 

ARTHUR R. FREEDLANDER, Instructor 

Eleventh Season commences July 2 :: Landscape and Portrait Classes 

For information address 

A. R. FREEDLANDER, 80 West 40th Street, New York 



MODERN ART SCHOOL 



72 WASHINGTON SQUARE SOUTH, NEW YORK 

SUMMER CLASSES at PROVINCETOWN, MASS. 

Sculpture, Painting From June 7 until Sept. 25 Models, Landscape 

A school of ideals and progress. Individual attention. Limited classes. 
MVRA MUSSELMAN. FREDERIC BURT, Sculpture BROR J. O. NORDFELDT, Painting 

Address Secretary for information. Write Provincetown after June 5. 




CLASS IN DESIGN 
AT PROVINCETOWN M 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF MARY BACON JONES 

JULY 7 TO AUGUST 11 

This course is intended to encourage in the student, 
whether inexperienced layman or professional art 
worker, an appreciation of beauty and the applica- 
tion of its principles to matters of everv-day living, 

through the study of textile pattern, landscape and 
natural forms. 

For circulars address Mary Bacon Jonks, 
Three Dunes, Provincetown, Mass. 



THE AUTHOR OF 



THE PAINTER IN OIL 



WILL CONDUCT 



A Summer Painting Class in 
Eastern Massachusetts. 



Address 



Burleigh Parkhurst, 



708 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston. 



SUMMER CLASS IN LANDSCAPE PAINTING 

at Rockport, Mass. June 21 to Sept. 18 

Special attention to color and light. Catalogue sent 
on request. Address, W. LESTER STEVENS, 
Rockport, Mass. 



Mr. Eben F. Comins 

Summer School of Landscape 
Painting, Design, and Life 
Drawing with Figure Models 

EAST GLOUCESTER, MASS. 

EIGHT WEEKS' COURSE 
July 1 to August 28, 1915 

The principles of Area Cutting, Linear Movement, 
Laws of Color— the Ross Color System— and Design 
will form the basis of instruction, instead of correc- 
tive criticisms. Especial attention will be given to 
the handling of the materials and mediums em- 
ployed. 

Illustrated circular sent on application. Address 

Mr. EBEN F. COMINS 
203 Fenway Studios Boston, Mass. 



THE 





BOOKLET 

ON REQUCXT 




-~ .r. t OLHKJMIRE HILLS, MOMTCRCY t MAS5 

£7u««*« * A YS Wi/^ii: C i N -" T W ' WATWM or W*n- INSTITUTE 

■ SUBJECT* -IULV S TO AWCU5T |<+ .O INSTRUCTOR* 





. 



^ 



M 



8 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



June, iQi S hne% IQIC . 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



9 







CALIFORNIA 



NINTH ANNUAL SUMMER SESSION 

JUNE 21 to JULY 31 




\T PIEDMONT— Classes in out-of-door Sketching 
and Painting 

AT BERKFXEY— Classes in Industrial. Normal 
and Fine Arts and the various crafts 

Competent Instructors Full Equipment 

Frederick H. Meyer, Director 

Direct Ferry Connection from Both Places to 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition 



JOHONNOT SUMMER SCHOOL 
OF DESIGN AND HANDWORK 

JULY 5 TO AUGUST 7 
Pacific Grove, Monterey Co., California 

Under the Direction of 
Ralph Helm Johonnot and Salome L. Johonnot 

The study of design through progressive ex- 
ercises using flower, bird and animal forms in 
abstract interpretation. 

The application of design through wood-block 
printing, embroidery and other crafts. 

Landscape interpretation in fiat tones. The 
Monterey peninsula, with its old adobes, quaint 
gardens and beautiful bay, affords varied and 
unique subjects for outdoor sketching. 

Deli* htfnl Summer Climate Circulars Upon Request 



L *£M£$%L a . SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN 

All branches wider trained specialist*. School 
open all the year. Illustrated catalogue. 

Est. Inc. 1887 L. E. G. MACLEOD. Dir. 



COLLEGEo/FINEARTS 

University of Southern California 

Session — July 6th to August 20th 



bummer Session- 

PAINTING AND DRAWING, DESIGN, APPLIED ART 

Ideal Conditions for Study 

W. L. JUDSON, Dean, 200 S. Ave. 66, Los Angeles, Cat. 

Bulletin on request 



The Stickney Memorial 
School of Fine Arts 

Corner of Fair Oaks and Lincoln Avenues 
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 

A New School offering exceptional opportunities 
for Art Study in the West. Special classes in Paint- 
ing from the Landscape throughout the winter. 

For further particulars apply to C. P. Townsley. 
Director. 



CARMEL SUMMER SCHOOL OF ART 

CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA, CALIFORNIA 

Cool and invigorating climate. Landscape pictur- 
esque and varied. Well-equippedArtSchool. Models 
posing daily. Excellent boarding accommodations. 

Near San Francisco and the Panama-Pacific Exposition 

For particulars address C. P. Townsley, Director 
Stickney Memorial School of Fine Arts, Pasadena' 
California. 



M I N NE S OTA 



1i?nn00 EA * N ED BY YOUNG 

*rL.\J\J ARTIST in FmipriAvc 



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by making drawing fur National 
Advertiser. We trained him. We 
can help V ou too. Competent 
commercial artists always in 
demand. Send for catalogue 
and particulars 

FrdVral sHionl (UmwrrM 
■Ignfnp, j 701 Warner Bldg., 
Minneapolis. Minn. 



The designation of this lit lie figure as a 
"Snake Goddess" requires a word of ex- 
planation. In 1903 Sir Arthur Evans dis- 
covered, let into the floor of a small inner 
room in the palace at Knossos, two large 
stone chests, which, as was evident from 
the character of some of the objects found 
in them, contained the treasures of a 
shrine. Chief among them were the 
remains of several statuettes ol women 
holding snakes, executed with greal skill in 
faience. 

With them were found votive robes 
and girdles, small reliefs of cows and 
goats with their young, also in faience, a 
cross of orthodox Greek shape in veined 
grey and white marble, and a series of 
small steatite libation tables. One of 

the statuettes stands in the same attitude 

as the ivory figure, grasping in one hand 
the head, in the other the tail of a snake 
which coils around her, while two other 
snakes are knotted about her waist. I br 




HEAD OF MINOAN SNAKE GODDESS 
(TWICE NATURAL SIZE) 



costume is also similar, except that the 
apron is double, reaching to the knee at 
the front and back, and that the head-dress 
is of simpler design and much higher. The 
other wears a seven-flounced skirt and 
holds aloft a small, wriggling snake in each 
hand. 

The discoverer explains the larger figure 
as the great Cretan goddess in her 
chthonic aspect, the smaller figure and 
others, of which only fragments are pre- 
served, as votaries. Other scholars prefer 
to call all such figures snake-charmers, put- 
ting them on a par with the acrobats, male 
and female, who performed daring feats 
with wild bulls for the entertainment of 
Minoan lords and ladies. And still an- 
other example— that of a bronze statu- 
ette in Berlin— seems to justify this inter- 
pretation. The figure stands in a mo- 
mentary pose, her knees slightly bent, her 
right hand raised before her head, and her 
left reaching across to grasp the snake on 



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By Ruth Sawyer 

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By ( 'hristine Terhune 1 1 cr rick 



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i6mo, 50 cents net 

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By Sarah J. MacLeod 

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I he hook contains the results 
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cleaning that come within the 
housekeeper's range. The follow- 
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HARPER & BROTHERS. 







er right shoulder. The heads of two 

other snakes appear on t he top of her he. id, 

and their bodies are knotted together on 

her back. The two theories are not mu- 
tually exclusive, but if some of these snake- 
charming ladies are human, they are per- 
haps best regarded as priestesses of the 
great goddess who is herself represented by 
the larger of the two faience statuettes. 

And our ivory figure, with her elaborati 
crown and stately pose, ; s more probably 

the central figure of the cull rather than 

one of her minist rants. 

But the subject represented by the statu- 
ette is of less interest to us than the art 
which fashioned it. Though th. figure 

stands in the strictly frontal pose which is 
characteristic of all sculpture in the round 

prior to that of the ( .reeks in the fifth cen- 
tury, it is not still and rigid, but on the 
contrary, full of life and energy. The 
shoulders are drawn back and the chin is 
held in, so that the outline of the back 
forms one sweeping curse from the top of 
the head-dress to the waist. All the repre 
scntations of Minoan men and women 
which have come down to us show this 
same proud bearing; it seems not to have 
been an artistic convention, but a faithful 
rendering of the actual appearance of this 
aristocratic people. Combined with the 
keen expression of the face and the set of 
the tense, muscular, yet shapely arm. it 
gives the figure an air of vivid reality which 
is quite indescribable. It would be diffi- 
cult, indeed, to find a statuette ol the 
classical Greek period which could stand a 
comparison in this regard. 

Minoan and Mycenaean sites have 
yielded numerous examples of carving in 
ivory, mostly of a decorative character, 
such as sword-hilts and mirror-handles. 
Human figures and heads in relief are also 
not lacking. But the only works in the 
round which can be compared with our 
statuette are the well-known series of 
figurines found in Knossos in 1902, repre- 
senting acrobats engaged in the favourite 
sport of bull-grappling. The best pre- 
served of these figures is illustrated here. 
He is to lie thought of as leaping over the 
back of a charging bull. In the words 
of Dr. Evans, "the life, the freedom, the 
elan of these ivory figures is nothing short 
of marvellous, and in some respects seems 
to overpass the limits of the sculptor's art. 
The graceful fling of the legs and arms, the 
backward bend of the head and body, give 
a sense of untrammelled motion, to a cer- 
tain extent attainable in painting or relief, 
but which it is hard to reconcile with the 
fixity of position inherent in statuary in the 
round." 

The problem which the artist of the 
snake goddess set himself called for less 
daring treatment, but in imparting such 
vigorous life to the quietly standing little 
figure, he has accomplished a feat which is 
hardly less marvellous, and which proves 
him to have belonged to the same school. 

Idle carving ol details is at least equally 

delicate, though the statuette is on a 
smaller scale, and the rich court dress gave 
an opportunity for a much more lavish 
application of gold ornament. 

In contemplating such figures as these 

we regret that the Minoans have left us 
little or no sculpture on a large scale. This 
is to be explained less by the lack of a 
suitable material on the island than by the 
essential character of their art — its free- 
dom, movement and exuberant life, which 



MICHIGAN 




SUMMER SCHOOL OF PAINTING. SAUGATUGK, MICH. 

SEVENTH SEASON cJUNE 21 *° AUG 2&. 1915 ^ 

„ FREDERICK FRARY FURSMAN AND GEORGE SENSENEY.. DIRECTORS. , 

Glasses in pictorial composition, landscape and figure paiTiring. etching 
design, arts and crafts. ^Write for booklet. R'm. 1207 Tov^er B'lilg. ChicagoXJ 



School 




Fine Arts 



DETROIT 

Independent and progressive. Thorough training 
In Drawing and Painting from Life; Illustration; 
Composition. Limited student's list. Illustrated 
catalog sent upon request. 

JOHN P. WICKER, Director 
Fine Arts Building Detroit, Michigan 



ILLINOIS 



OHIO 



ART ACADEMY 
of CINCINNATI 

Established in 1869 and supported 
by large endowments, it maintains a 
faculty of artists of national repu- 
tation. This school has given to a 
large number of painters, sculptors 
and designers the fundamental 
training upon which their success 
has depended. Adjacent to the 
Academy is the Cincinnati Museum 
with large collections of modern 
paintings, sculpture and other 
works of art. 

Frank Duveneck C. J. Barnhorn 

L. H. Meakin J. R. Hopkins 

Wm. H. Fry, and others 

mer Term, 10 weeks, June 14 to Aug. 21 

For Catalog address 
GEST. Director, Art Academy, CINCINNATI 




Sum 



J. H. 



The Art Institute of Chicago 

ART SCHOOL 

N. H. CARPENTER, Secretary and Director Pro Tern. 
A MODERN SCHOOL OF ART 

Drawing, Illustration, Painting. Sculpture 
Designing, Normal Instruction, Architecture 

Day and Evening Classes 
Saturday Classes for Teachers and Children 

Largest and most completely equipped School of 
Fine Arts in America. Unequaled environment 
provided for students — the Museum, with its ex- 
hibits of permanent and traveling art collections — 
the Ryerson Library — the Fullerton Memorial Hall 
— and large studio class rooms — afford unusual op- 
portunities for the study of art. Instruction con- 
ducted along most advanced lines. 

School in session throughout the year 
Students may enter at any time 

For Illustrated catalogue write to Dept. P. 
T. J. EEANE, Dean of the School, Michigan Ave. at Adams St. 



I ND IANA 




THE JOHIMHERRUN 
ART-INSTITUTE 

INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA 

DRAWING— PAINTING— DESIGN— NORMAL ART 

Practical, fundamental instruction, with unusual 
opportunity for study in the museum and library. 
Diplomas given. For catalog, address Dept. A. 

Harold Haven Brown, Director. 






MISSOURI 







Washington University 

ST. LOUIS SCHOOL 
of FINE ARTS 

Fully equipped to give instruc- 
tion in Drawing, Ceramic 
Decoration, Pottery, Painting, 
Applied Arts, Composition, 
Modeling, Bookbinding, 
Crafts, Illustration. 

For full information and free 
Illustrated handbook apply to 

E. H. WUERPEL, Director 

tklnktr Road and Llndoll Boulevard 

St. Louis, Mo. 



DOCODOOOaOOOOCOOOOOOOCDOO 

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□ 
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The Chicago 
Academy of Fine Arts 

CARL N. WERNTZ, Director 

a feature of which is the 

SUNSHINE PAINTING AND 
ILLUSTRATING CLASSES 

Wonderful light effects. Ex- 
actly like outdoor nature, 
but unaffected by weather 
conditions. Ideal at all sea- 
sons. Similar to those con- 
ducted before the war in the 
Academie Colorossi, Paris. There is no better way 
to study the modern idea in color. Pupils may enter 
this or other Vocational Art Classes at any time. 

The best features of the Paris Academies and the 
Munich Kuntz-Gewerbe Schulen and all related as 
nowhere else to the Art needs of America. 

May I tell you more of this wonderful institution? 

Carl Maxwell Newman, Registrar 
81 EAST MADISON STREET. CHICAGO 



ec 



!u?{3D&-stac?k 



□ QOaOODDQO 3 3QOC0C2C0C 



Chic a 





School 
of Applied and 
Normal Art EMMA D ^ URCH 

Professional training in Illustration, Decorative De- 
sign, Commercial Design and Illustration, Normal 
Art and the Hand Crafts. Two-year courses. Lim- 
ited membership, personal attention. We have a 
waiting list. Make arrangements for entrance early. 
Write for particulars to Secretary, 310-606 S. 
Michigan Avenue. 



■M 



IO 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



June, 1015 June, 191 5 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



1 1 






ZW^IUUW 



RemBrandt 



Col 



o vs 



Made in Holland 




Quality Features of Rembrandt Colors are 

Purity of Tone 



Per 



manence 



Perfect Consistency 
Finely Ground 

Write for Booklet containing many interesting facts 

TALENS & SON, Irvington, N. J. 

Laboratories: Apeldoorn, Holland 



.H 



t 



NEW LOCATION of 



THE PALETTE ART GO. 

327 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK, below 33d St. 
Everything needed by the up-to-date Artist and Art Student 



OUGA CELEBRATED FINE ART STUDIES 

suitable for copying in oils, and water-colors for Chi»a 
and other decorative work. Illustrated Catalogue, with 
premiums and discounts, showing flower, fruit, figure, 
landscape, animal studies, etc. 30c. Only one and t-wo- 
cent stamps accepted. No foreign money or stamps. 

Agent, M. G. PRICE. 359 West 118th Street, New York 




HIGGINS 



DRAWING INKS 

ETERNAL WRITING INK 

, x ENGROSSING INK 

TAURINE MUCILAGE 

PHOTO-MOUNTER PASTE 

DRAWING-BOARD PASTE 
LIQUID PASTE 

OFFICE PASTE 
VEGETABLE GLUE, ETC. 

THE FINEST AND BEST 
INKS AND ADHESIVES 

Emancipate yourself from the 
mse of corrosive and ill-smell- 
lng inks and adhesive* and 
adopt the Higgins' Inks and 
Adhesivea. They will be a 
revelation to you, they are so 
eweet, clean and well put up. 

At Dealers Generally 

Cha«.M.Higgin«&Co.,Mfri. 

271 Ninth Street. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Br&nohet: Chicago, London 



The Inks Used in Printing This 
Magazine Are Manufactured by 

THE AULT & WIBORG COMPANY 



ARTISTS' BLOUSES 

(FRMNCH SMOCKS) 

$2.00 Sent Prepaid on receipt of «0 00 
W *Z? State Height and Weight **' W 

». FA LEIMiAIKER. 25 We.t 42d Str^t, NEW TORE 



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lM E W iC^v 



FRED REYNOLDS 

Fine Art Printer of Artistic Etchings, Dry 
Points, Mezzotints, etc., especially in Colors 

Agent for Etchers* Tools, Plates, Grounds, Inks, Colors, etc. 

53 VESEY ST. Phone 2171 Cortlandt NEW YORK 



See America First 

AMONG THE CANADIAN ALPS 

By Lawrence J Burpee. With four full- page 
color plates and jorly reproductions from photo- 
graphs, and six maps. Boxed. Cloth. $ 3 .oo net. 

"An enthusiastic and eloquent description of the 
Canadian Alps and the National Parks of Canada. 

—Washington Evening Star. 

" The best and most beautiful illustrations of the 
Canadian Rockies that have appeared in book form. 
1 he text is sincere, enthusiastic and careful." 

—Springfield Republican. 

JOHN LANE COMPANY, New York 




LIFE STUDIES 



Draped and 
From the Nude 




These studies are for the exclusive use of people 
engaged in the various branches of art work 

PHOTOGRAPH PRINTS ON APPROVAL 

For a deposit of $5.00 a selection of 50 prints, average size 5 v 7 
Mil be sent on approval. Express prepaid. Price in -ss thVn 
dozen lots, 35c. each. $3.00 per dozen. $5.00 for 2 dozen 

For a deposit of $10.00 a selection of 72 prints will be^ent 42 
average size / x 10; and 30, 5 x 7. Price for 7 v in « An . 

*? <• »•«■ Per dozen; $5.00 for 2 dS 12 of^ch ££&$£. 

Circular Free 

THE AURORA STUDIOS, Boston, Mass. 



could not find expression in srulpturr as 

practised later by the Creeks. Even their 

frescoes, with some notable exceptions, 

such as the Cupbearer, from Knossos, an 

for the most part on a small scale. And 
among their greatest triumphs arc thi 

mini. ii lire reliefs on the Vaphio Cups and 

the steatite vases from Hagia Triada. 
Rare and precious materials, beauty of 
form .mkI (..lour, refinement oi technique, 
attracted them rather than grandeur and 
bulk. This tendency was already strongly 
marked at the very beginning of the 
Bronze V, , .is is shown by the series .,t 
stone vases in the Museum, which are 
dated about 2500 B.C. It is illustrated 
still heiier by our chryselephantine statu- 
ette caned a thousand years later, in tin 

period in which Minoan art reached its 
highest development. — Museum of Fine 

Arts Bulletin. 






I 




HE MARY BLAIR COLLECTION 
AT PITTSBURGH 




A 1 1111 close of the exercises on Found 

er's Day, April 29, the exhibition of the 
Mary Blair Collection was opened to tin 
public in the galleries at Carnegie Insti 
"He. Pittsburgh, the exhibition to remain 

Open for two months. The collection is 

lent to Carnegie Institute through the 
generosity of the collector herself, Mrs. 
< 'hauncey J. Blair. 

A large portion of the collection wa 
shown at the Arden Studios in New York 
before going to Pittsburgh. Other por- 
tions were sent from the Art Institute of 

Chicago, the Albright Art Gallery of 

Hull. do and from the residence of \h- 

Blair in Chicago. The exhibition affords 
an unprecedented opportunity to tin 
people of Pittsburgh for the study of 

examples of works by artists and craftsmen 
from the earliest periods of European de- 
velopment to the later styles of the French 
renaissance — work important for its style, 

design, colour and for the gre.u histori al 
interest attaching to characteristic speci : 

mens of the .ureal epochs of the past. 

I he collection consists of works in a 

variety of media : Sculpture in stone, wood, 
marble, tern, cotta and faience; primitive 

designs in silver-gilt plate; early paintings 
and drawings; furniture from many peri- 
ods; architectural detail in the original 
material; textiles of rare pattern; embroid- 
eries, tapestries, and panels of carved wood. 
Ecclesiastical art is represented in church 

ornaments and furniture, in pictures of 
scriptural scenes and in objects of devo- 
tion. 

Chests, tables, chairs, and decorative 
panels in wood may be cited as exam- 
pies of secular art. The element of colour 
is supplied by numerous examples of paint- 
ing, polychromed stone and wood, stained 

glass and many-tinted fabrics— all en- 
hanced by the inimitable charm of t he- 
tone of time. 

The collection is well known in Europe, 
having been seen and admired by the 
sculptor Rodin and by those who direct 

the great collections of the Louvre and the 
Ka.ser Friedrich Museum. The Mary 
I lair ( ollection has bee,, compared with 
™ collection of the M usee de Cluny, par- 
ticularly as manj of the objects belonging 
to Mrs. Blair are rivals to others of like 
nature m the Paris Museum. 



SKETCHING 
MATERIAL 

PAINTING 
OUTFITS 

SKETCHING 
UMBRELLAS 

EASELS 

Equipment of Summer Classes 

Especially A It ended to 

Schools Supplied at Reduced Prices 

We spare no expense in I he prep- 
aration of our Artists' Oil and 
Water Colors and ( anvases and 

in the acquisition of highest grade pigments and vehicles. 
Coupled with almost 50 years" experience in grinding, this 
guarantees American-made colors par excellence for bril- 
liancy, permanency and working quality. 

Pamphlet of Testimonials, Catalogues and Sample Books on request 

MATERIALS FOR ETCHING 

Wooden and steel presses for pulling proofs and for commercial work. 

Etchers* ground, dry-point needles. Copperplates. 



. WEBER 

(Established 1854) 

A rtists ' Colormen — Manufacturers 



CO. 



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Branches 

St. Louis, Mo.; Baltimore, Md. 

Our Colors, Canvases, etc., can be procured 
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FOUNTAIN DESIGN 

Which won the Helen Foster Barnett Prize at the Winter Academy Exhibition 

1914 by Louis J. Urkh 



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For years The Gorham Company has fostered the 
art of our Native Sculptors. 

Their big broad ambition to make their Gall 
representative of the best and highest of that art is 
accomplished. 

Visitors, whether purchasers or not, will b 
dially welcomed. 

Correspondence on every phase of the subject will 
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THE GORHAM CO. 



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QUEEN HENRIETTA MARIA." 

FROM THE PAINTING BY 

SI R ANTH O N Y VAN DYCK 














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INTERNATIONAL 






VOL. LV. No. 220 



Copyright, 1915 by John Lane Company 



JUNE, 1915 




HE SAX DIEGO AXD SAX FRAN- occasion for undue conservatism. Like the 



CISCO EXPOSITIONS 

BY CHRISTIAN BRIXTON 



Editor's Notk— // was Dr. Christian Brinton's wish 
to have the two expositions run concurrently in this issue 
but considerations of space have necessitated our reserving 
San Francisco for the month of July. This will enable 
us to illustrate the articles more fully. Other contributions 
by the same writer will follow in due course giving special 
heed to the paintings and statuary. 

I. San Diego 



It must be confessed 



that the congenital 



weakness for hyperbole which obtains west of 
the Mississippi leads one to be cautious not 
alone of the Grand Canyon but of the eloquent lv 
exploited expositions at San Diego and San Fran- 
cisco. Superlatives not unwarrantably make for 
suspicion, yet in none of these instances is there 



thumb-print of God pressed into the surface of the 
earth so that man may forever identify His handi- 
work, the Canyon transcends the possibilities of 
verbal or pictorial expression. Although by no 
means so ambitious as its competitor, or, rather, 
its complement, farther northward along the his- 
toric Camino Real, the Panama-California Exposi- 
tion has scant reason to fear comparison with the 
Panama-Pacific. Restricted in area yet rich in 
suggestion the San Diego Exposition is a synthe- 
sis of the spacious Southwest. It seems to have 
sprung spontaneously from the soil and the vivid 
race consciousness of those who inhabit this vast 
and fecund hinterland. Regional in the sense that 
the recent Baltic Exposition at Malmo and the 
Valencian Exposition of 1909 were regional, it is 
at once more concentrated and more characteristic 





Panama-California Exposition, San Diego 
ACROSS THE ESPLANADE 



ARCHITECT, FRANK! P. ALLEN, JR. 



CV 






The San Diego and San Francisco Expositions 







than either of those memorable displays. 
Though you may have seen many expositions 
you have encountered none like this red-tiled, 
white-walled city set amid luxurious semi-tropical 
vegetation and flanked on one side by a deeply 
incised arroyo, and on the other by the azure 
expanse of the sea. On crossing the majestic 
Puente Caballo you enter the Plaza de California, 
or California Quadrangle, the architecture of 
which furnishes the keynote of the exposition. 



It is impossible not to respond to the seductive 
flavour and opulent fancy of such an offering as 
confronts one at Balboa Park. Climatic condi- 
tions royally concur in assisting the architect to 
the utmost. Almost every conceivable flower, 
plant and tree here attains unwonted magnifi- 
cence. The sun is brilliant but does not burn, 
and the close proximity of the sea softens and 
freshens the atmosphere without undue prepon- 
derance of moisture. Proceed along the acacia- 



To the left is the California Building, which exem- lined Prado which constitutes the main axis of the 
plifies the cathedral type, to the right is the Fine general plan, stroll under the cloisters, linger in 
Arts Building, which conforms to the better- the patios, or follow one of the countless calcadas 




Panama-California Exposition, Son Diego 



VIEW FROM THE LACUNA DE CABALLO 



known Mission style. These structures are per- 
manent, and are not only a credit to the exposition 
and the municipal authorities, but reveal in new 
and congenial light the varied talent of their 
designer, Mr. Bertram G. Goodhue. At San 
Diego you have in brief something that at once 
strikes a picturesque and appropriate note. The 
remaining buildings which, with the exception of 
the Music Pavilion, are the creation of Mr. Frank 



or pathways skirting the crest of the hill, and you 
will experience the sensation of being in the gar- 
dens of a typical Mexican mission. The mind 
indeed travels even farther back— back to the 
Alcazar of Sevilla, the Generalife, and to remote 
and colourful Byzantium. Unlike most of its 
predecessors, the San Diego Exposition does not 
convey an impression of impermanency. The 
luxuriance of the floral and arboreal accompani- 



^^r:rr:- s ^-- r^^^^^ssc 



motif with conspicuous success. None of them 



srii^szzsi ; ™: IIS" "? is ' f s ! incl sense °' beritoMt > 



uncommon capacity for the assimilation and adap- 
tation of this singularly effective architectural st vie. 



which is at one with the land and its people— a 
visible expression of the collective soul of the 
Southwest. 




Panama-California Exposition, San Diego 



CVI 



A MISSION PATIO 

SOUTHERN COUNTIES BUILDING 



' 

















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1 


_ 





The San Diego and San Francisco Expositions 



■ 



- 



It need scarcely be assumed, however, that this 
radiant city which smiles down from its green- 
capped acropolis came into being over night, as it 
were. Behind this symphony of beauty is a back- 
ground of solid endeavour and serious research 
along widely divergent lines. Mr. Goodhue's 
California Building is a successful adaptation to 
exposition exigencies of the impressively ornate 
cathedral at Oaxaca, Mexico. The New Mexico 
State Building, with its more severe silhouette and 
massive weathered beams protruding from the 
outside walls, is a free amplification of the famous 
adobe mission of the Indian pueblo of Acoma, the 
"sky city," dating from 1699. The essentially 
composite character of Spanish architecture is 
now T here better illustrated than in these various 



heritage would have amply justified its existence. 
The same consistency of aim and idea which 
characterizes the architectural features of the 
exposition obtains in other fields of activity. It 
has been the intention of those in charge to show 
processes rather than products, and nowhere is 
this more significantly set forth than in the Cali- 
fornia Building, which enshrines examples of the 
stupendous plastic legacy of the Maya civiliza- 
tion, and in the Indian Arts Building, which is 
devoted to displays of the craftsmanship of the 
present-day Indian of the Southwest. To begin 
with the deep-rooted substratum of primitive 
effort which stretches back into dim antiquity, and 
to fol'ow its development down to modern days 
entails no small amount of labour and scholarship. 



structures, where you are confronted by turns with For this task the exposition authorities were for- 
de tails Roman and Rococo, late Gothic and tunate in securing the services of Dr. Edgar L. 
Renaissance, Classic and Chirugueresque. Still, 
despite this manifest complexity of origin and in- 
spiration, the ensemble achieves the effect of com- 
plete unity. The very flexibility of the style em- 
ployed is its greatest asset when it comes to solv- 
ing problems of such a nature. You, in short, 
witness here in San Diego the actual revival of 
Spanish-Colonial architecture, and you will 
scarcely fail to agree that as a medium it is as 



Hewett and a corps of competent assistants from 
the Smithsonian Institute, Washington. Dr. 
Hewett is one of that rapidly increasing number 
of scientists who feel the indissoluble connection 
between ethnology and aesthetics. Nothing finer 
has thus far been accomplished than his installa- 
tion of the several exhibits in this particular sec- 
tion. The collections of pottery, rugs, baskets 
and domestic utensils, and the detailed series 



perfectly adapted to the physical and social con- of drawings illustrating that graphic symbolism 

ditions of the Southwest as is the English-Colonial, which is an inherent element in all aboriginal 

or Georgian, to the needs of the East. Had the artistic expression, are as extensive as they are 

Panama-California Exposition accomplished noth- stimulating. On comparing these latter with the 

ing else, this rehabilitation of our Spanish-Colonial canvases devoted to native type and scene by Mr. 




Panama-California Exposition, San Diego 
COMMERCE AND INDUSTRIES BUILDINGS 



CVIII 



ARCHITECT, FRANK P. ALLEN, JR. 




* 



Copyright, 1015, Panama-California Exposition, San Diego 



FACADE OF THE CALIFORNIA STATE BUILDING 
ARCHITECT, BERTRAM G. GOODHUE 







IB 



■ 



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Wie San Diego mid San Francisco Expositions 



Robert Henri, Mr. Joseph H. Sharp, and others in 

the Fine Arts Building, one is forced to conclude 
that the capacity for pictorial representation has 
diminished rather than increased with the advent 
ot our latter-day art schools and academies. 

You can hardly expect perfection, even in such 

an exposition as that at San Diego, and it is in the 
choice of paintings for this same Fine Arts Build- 
ing that one may point to a certain lapse from an 
otherwise consistently maintained standard. It 
is not that Mr. Henri and his coterie are not 



gleaming little city perched upon its green-crested 
mesa teaches anything, it teaches that the most 

precious things in life and in art are those that I. 

nearest the great eloquent heart of nature. The 

subtle process ,,f interaction which forever goes 

silently on between man and his surroundings, the 

identity between that which one sees and t ds 
upon and that which one produces, are facts u hit ■} 

you find convincingly presented at the San Diego 
Exposition. It is more than a mere show-window 
of the Southwest. Alike in it> architecture and 



admirable artists. It u simply that they do not its specific offerings it typifies the richness and 




Panama-California Exposition, San Di. 



ENTRANCE TO THE VARIED 
INDUSTRIES BUILDING 



ARCHITECT, FRANK P. ALLEN, IK 



lit into what appears to be and in other respects 

manifestly i s a carefully worked-out programme. 

San Diego is so rich in the fundamental sources of 
beauty and feeling that had there been no paint- 
ings on view one would have had scant cause for 
complaint. The welcome absence of the custom- 
ary flatulent and dropsical statuary, which is <uch 
a happy feature of the exterior arrangements, 

might well have been supplemented by the exclu- 
sion of the pretentious and sophisticated canvas 
Intensive rather than extensive in appeal, bas 
ing itself frankly upon local interest and tradition 
conscious of its inheritance and looking with con- 
fidence toward the future, the Panama-California 
Exposition stands as a model of its kind. If this 



romance not alone of New Spain but of immemo- 
rial America. 



RTHLR HOEBER 




Following closely upon the death of 

*. Hopkinson Smith, so famous in the triple role 



A If red / '// ilipfie Roll 




d Paris Salon 1H80. In //;<• Museum of Valenciennes 
mi STRIKE OF THE MINERS 




LFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 
BY PAUL VITRY 



The personality as well as the work 
of the president of the ''Societe Nation- 
ale drs Beaux Arts," Alfred Roil, is certainly anions 
the highest, the most noble, and at the same time 

the most significant of that of any of the contem- 

porarv French artists. Even as in the midst of 
strife the combatants gather around the flag, the 
symbol of their honour and their valour, likewise 
there is to be found in a nation men who are like 
the standard-bearers, and in whom one proudly 
places confidence in critical moments because thev 
embody the essential virtues of their race, because 



e - . — ~- — ~- M*jf*v IUIC J "•»- "swvuwai vuiuwui Lll\_ll IctCC, UCtdUSC 

oi author, artist and engineer, it is our sad task to it is happy to recognise itself in them, happy to 



ex 



record the loss of that genial writer and artist 
Vrtnur Hoeber, who for many years has been a 

contributor to our columns and an ever welcome 
friend inside and outside of the office He 
was a landscapist of merit and the kindliest 
critic that ever sat in judgment upon the work 

ot others. 



be represented by them in the eyes of the universe. 
None was ever more worthy than Roll to be, in the 
anxious and critical days through which we are 
now passing, the ambassador of French art to the 
United States. His character is worthy of the 
situation, and the power which he enjoys is due as 
much to his generous nature and his loyal and 



BY ALFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 



fearless independence as to the brilliancy of his 
great genius. Xo other series of works could 
represent more magnificently than those of Roll. 
to the friendly people of the great American 
republic, the effort of an entire generation of art- 
ists. At the same time these works express the 
fruitful labour of an admirably filled career, and 
offer a collection of French art at once virile and 
official, profoundly individual and free and expres- 
sive of a common ideal. 

It was immediately following the great national 
crisis of 1870-1871, that Roll began to manifest 
his artistic activities; he was then twenty-five 
years of age, being born in 1846. He was a 
Parisian by birth but came originally from an 
Alsatian family, and was brought up in the indus- 
trial centre of Faubourg Saint-Antoine. His 
vocation was spontaneously revealed to him, and 
he left the industrial apprenticeship for the art of 
painting. His first attempts were landscapes, in- 
spired by those of the masters of the great school 
of 1830, which was at that time accomplishing its 
evolution. Later, after a short course in the 



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Alfred Philippe Roll 

classical studios of Geromc and Bonnat, some ties which he places first in his ambitions, in his 



strong studies of figures, dated 1873, bear witness 
to the power and forcefulness of his work. Some 
pictures of romantic or mythological character, 
such as Don Juan cl Haydee, in the Museum of 
Avignon, or as his Chajseresse in the embassy at 
Constantinople, again express certain tendencies 
of retarded romanticism. From this date it is the 
strong realism which attracts Roll— it is the ardent 
life; his Bacchante of 1873, evokes a fiery elegance 
which is exclusively his own, the memory of certain 



studies of the nude, in his compositions of seem 

from contemporary history, as well as the dail 
life of the working world, and in his portraits, of 
which the greater part were produced in the vivid 
light of garden or held. 

L'Inondation a Toulouse, painted in 1877, and 
now in the -Museum of Havre; La Fete de SUhne.on 
the other hand, dated 1870, and which is at the 
Museum of Ghent, show the last concessions to 
the art of the school. The iirst, with its dramatic 





Lenlfi r Exhibition in Ameri 



WAR: FORWARD MARCH 



- " from the Luxembourg through courtesy of the Fre 



nch Government and M. Uonct Benedite 



BY ALFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 



voluptuous nudes and realistic worK nf r A , 1 , 

whilst here and therein TZ^^ ££ T" "^ ^ *** ** *»* «* 
n its snlAn^„, ™i :*. — ., l 1L1 »S,^mcn cault had unwitting V hrnnerht ™,f ;« u: c _ 



in is splendour and its warmth savours yet of the 
stud 10) one ^ aIready notC; ag g^. ^ 

the grey and black which came directly from 
Manet Of recent date, Roll's work has inclined 



cault had unwittingly brought out in his famous 
Radeaude la Meduse, presents also a tragic power 
which justifies the memory of that master with 

~ - -~o -on s worK nas inclined MoTo ^ f ^ deliRhtS l ° C ° mpare our ■**• 

toward the art of the innovators, and it ha" en th T ' t° ^ "^ ^ b his s P irited *»* of 

more toward the bright and luminous paintW 2\ ' " "^ ° f his sketches > as well 

that all the sympathies of the artist have n betwJnT ^ COm P ositio -> * common link 

swayed, despite the lack of understanding of the danced Tl f t0 ^ Unbridkd and ^ ous 

public and the opposition of the critics It is the T Bacchantes about the Old Silenus, it is 

search after the atmospheric and luminous quali! ^t^^^' whol esome, powerful, and de- 

1 n ° teb the same g^erous temperament as the 



Alfred Philippe Roll 




In the Palais des luuux-Arts, Paris 
THE TILLERS OF THE SOIL 



BY ALFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 



analogous compositions of our great sculptor, 
Dalou, who also distinguished himself about the 
same time, and whom Roll knew and loved for 
many years. But as Dalou was held back by 
classical tradition and the less rapid emancipation 
of sculpture, it was not until much later that he 



essayed the realistic subjects, the types and 
scenes of popular life to which he aspired. Roll, 
since 1880, in his Strike of the Miners (to-day at the 
Museum of Valenciennes), continuing the effort 
of Courbet in the Stone Breakers and of UEntcrre- 
ment a Ornans, deliberately adopts the most dra- 

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matic reality with a keen sense of expressive and 
human truth. Zola, Goncourt and Maupassant are 

the literary inspirators and here appears succes- 
sively after The Strike, antedating, let us observe, 
by several years the "Germinal" of Zola, that 
grand page illustrated by Roll in [882: The 
Popular Fete of July 14th in 1SS5, Le Chantier en 
Travail dc Su resnes in 1887. The Forward Mare//, 
an incident full 
of action of the 
campaign of 
187c, was in- 
spired by living 
memories (as 

Roll was lieuten- 
ant of militia 
during the war) : 
it is scrupulously 
realistic and free 
from useless bril- 
liancv or fancv 

- 

of any kind. 

In 1 89 1 The 

Commemoration 
of the Centennial 

of 1789 finally in- 
spired in Roll 

that colossal 
work which fig- 
ures in the Ver- 
sailles Museum 

and which, in the 

most simple and 

direct way, with 

neither pomp 

nor allegory, 

shows an enthu- 
siastic crowd, 
pressing around 
President Car- 
not. There one 
can recognize all 
the political fig- 
ures of the mo- 




oS^SfSSu. LJSf&SS llU Luxemb0tt ^ »«"* ™rtesy of the Fren< h 



THE WOMAN IN WHITE 



The Laying of the First Statu of the Alexander 

Bridge, exhibited in the Salon of 1899, and also 
destined for the Versailles Museum. These are 

Manda La Metrir, llu \ormandy Farm Woman, 

1SS0, now in the Luxembourg Museum; The Old 

Woman of Pieardv of i.SNi ; Rouln ( ement Maker 
of 1SS4. The Old Quarryman of i.SSq, and then 

again The Poor French Ragard and Louise Caitel 

(nurse) 1 894, The 

Tillers of the Soil 
and The Exodu 

of the sameyear, 
The Old Woman 
with the Faggot^ 

of 1 90 1, Tin 

Drama of the 
Earth and The 

( alvary of 1903. 
The last works of 
this series offer 

a note more or 
less harsh and 

sad. It i> no 

longer the joy- 
ous activities 
productive of 

the power of hu 
man effort, but 

oppression oi fa- 
tigue, mi>er y 
and despair 

which haunts 

the mind of the 
gloomy and sad- 
dened artist. 

However, before 

that crisis, per- 
taining to scenes 

of toil or of his- 
tory, numerous 

works, sparkling 
with health and 
the joy of living, 
had come from 



BY ALFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 



ment, both civic and artistic. The artist has sue- his brush Tl 1 . r*i , ., 

ceeded in exore™ in rt. ^ * L 1 L ^ hlS ^1 ^ s * ,,cndour (,f ** n ^e, the luxuri- 



ceeded in expressing in the dusk of the golden light 
which bathes the park of Louis XIV a memorable 
emption of a grand collective soul, exalted by the 
remembrance of the great Revolutionary days. 
Numerous independent figures accompany these 



ance of the auburn hair flowing in the sunlight, 
on a background of verdant nature, with the 
young bulls or colts prancing as accompanying 
figures, had many a time fascinated him. The 
Woman with the Bull in the Museum of Buenos 



great canvases which will prolong with more fre.h A T " ^ MUSeUm ° f Bucn « * 

ness and grace, if not oF^T^^Z^ Th" " t M "«** ««- °* the series. 

I er, tne memon of The magnificent decoration of the City Hall of 



Paris, The Joys of 
Life '1895), is the 

culmination of that 
period. 

Since then, time 
accompli b ing its 

mission, the mature 
and serene artist has 
followed two series of 

inspiration in his 
productions, here 

and there a note of 
bitterness, of sinister 
and quivering [hu- 
man distress, as in 
the striking picture, 
I fter the Sorrow, of 
1000, contiguous 

with the resplendent 

nudes of The Kiss of 

the Sun, The Woman 
ith a Dog or The 
Pink Room. At the 
same time of the sec- 
ond part of The Joys the old quarryman 

Life, Art, Motion, 
Labour and Light indicate a striving for ex- 
pression, more complex, a noble uneasiness of 
a mind in quest of a higher, more comprehensive 

,nd human art. Also the great canvas of ipoS, 
which the artist has entitled Through Nature to- 
ward Humanity, and which has taken a place in 

he Sorbonne; finally the ceiling, recently placed solution of the problem. 




out falling into the 
trivialitv of shallow 
or flat naturalism) 
to the most delicate 
and most full-blown 
flowers, which he 
knows how to fash- 
ion without a touch 
of academic insipid- 
ness. Whether Roll 
paints an old peasant 
showing the ravages 
of age, or a radiant 
and enchanting vis- 
ion of the nude form 
of a young maiden, 
it is in himself that 
he verifies the phil- 
osophical adage that 
" beauty is the splen- 
dour of truth." He 
shows the same deep 
passion in his pursuit 

I of plastic reality as 

by alfred philippe roll when he applies him- 
self with an untiring 
energy to produce that ideal of luminous truth by 
means of unceasing effort. His contemporaries 
and his rivals at times attempt to attain the same 
degree of greatness, but their audacity does not 
alarm him; on the contrary, they always find in 
him a sympathetic companion also seeking the 



in the Petit Palais at Paris, where triumphs a 
young and audacious Republic, all in vivid red, 
in the midst of figures of geniuses, philosophers, 
sages, workmen and soldiers, which unite to form 
its cortege. 

It is singular to note how much this observer, 
this painter of realistic scenes retains his individ- 
uality; how his temperament, his state of mind, 
either momentary or deep, appears through his 
productions, and whose ability is so admirably 
sketched by Leon Bourgeois, the great statesman 
and far-sighted psychologist. One has from the 
first, in the presence of Roll, the certainty of a 
profound sincerity, a man who devotes himself 
entirely to his work and who has no desire to be 
distinguished except through his own efforts. 
Nature to him is an open book, inexhaustible and 
multiform; he loves every aspect of it, from the 
most crude and ordinary (which he portrays with- 






Such a disposition as M. Roll's necessarily was 
the making of him and he has not missed his goal, 
that of a portrait painter of the highest order. 
His academy studies were always truthful and 
veritable portraits, serious and attentive. His 
first works, like that of his mother, dated 187S, 
still cling to a style a little scholastic, which we 
noticed not long ago at the beginning of his career. 
The Child on Horseback of the Salon of 1888, one of 
his sons, is a splendid result of a period of joyous 
exuberance. The Man in Mourning, in which one 
easily recognizes the artist himself, is a living wit- 
ness of the sad episodes of his life. Numerous fig- 
ures, already historical, reveal to us the meetings 
and the friendships which accumulate in the course 
of an active existence, intimately mingled with the 
life of a republican country. It is Jules Simon, 
Alphand, Yves Guyot, Antonin Proust, President 
Carnot and all those who figure in the canvas of 

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^#ra/ Philippe Roll 



matic reality with a keen sense of expressive and 
human truth. Zola, Goncourt and Maupassant are 
the literary inspirators and here appears succes- 
sively after The Strike, antedating, let us observe, 
by several years the "Germinal" of Zola, that 
grand page illustrated by Roll in 1882: The 
Popular Fete of July 14th in 1885, Le Chantier en 
Travail dc Suresnes in 1 88 7 . The Forward March, 
an incident full 
of action of the 
campaign of 
187c, was in- 
spired by living 
memories (as 
Roll was lieuten- 
ant of militia 
during the war) ; 
it is scrupulously 
realistic and free 

from useless bril- 
liancy or fancy 
of any kind. 

In 1 89 1 The 
Commemoration 
of the Centennial 
of 1 y%9 finally in- 
spired in Roll 
that colossal 
work which fig- 
ures in the Ver- 
sailles Museum 

and which, in the 

most simple and 

direct way, with 

neither pomp 

nor allegory, 

shows an enthu- 
siastic crowd, 
pressing around 
President Car- 
not. There one 
can recognize all 
the political fig- 
ures of the mo- 




cS&SfSSfS. tiTiZ^Te lke L ™»*<»»*> »rou gh courtesy of tke French 

THE WOMAN IN WHITE Rv ArT , 

«\ ALFRED PHILIPPE ROLL 



ment both civic and artistic. The artist has sue- his brush. 



The Laying of the First Stone of the Alexander 
Bridge, exhibited in the Salon of 1899, and also 
destined for the Versailles Museum. These are 
Manda La Metric, the Normandy Farm Woman, 
1880, now in the Luxembourg Museum; The Old 
Woman of Picardy of 1881; Rouby Cement Maker 
of 1S84, The Old Quarryman of 1889, and then 
again The Poor French Ragard and Louise Cattel 

(nurse) 1894, 77^ 
Tillers of the Soil 
and The Exodu 5 

of the same year, 
The Old Woman 
with the Faggot, 
of 1901, The 
Drama of the 
Earth and The 
Calvary of 190^. 

The last works of 
this series offer 
a note more or 
less harsh and 
sad. It is no 
longer the joy- 
ous activities 
productive of 
the power of hu- 
man effort, but 
oppression of fa- 
tigue, misery 
and despair 
which haunts 
the mind of the 
gloomy and sad- 
dened artist. 
However, before 
that crisis, per- 
taining to scenes 
of toil or of his- 
tory, numerous 
works, sparkling 
with health and 
the joy of living, 
had come from 






ceeded in expressing in the dusk of the golden light 
which bathes the park of Louis XIV a memorable 



The splendour of the nude, the luxuri- 



A If red Philippe Roll 




Paris, The Joys of 

Life (1895), i s the 

culmination of that 

period. 

Since then, time 

accomplishing its 

mission, the mature 

and serene artist has 

followed two series of 

inspiration in his 

productions, here 

and there a note of 

bitterness, of sinister 

and quivering [hu- 
man distress, as in 

the striking picture, 
[After the Sorrow, of 

iqo6, contiguous 
with the resplendent 
nudes of The Kiss of 
the Sun, The Woman 
with a Dog or The 
Pink Room. At the 
same time of the sec- 
ond part of The Joys the old quarryman 
of Life, Art, Motion, 




out falling into the 
triviality of shallow 
or flat naturalism) 
to the most delicate 
and most full-blown 
flowers, w T hich he 
knows how to fash- 
ion without a touch 
of academic insipid- 
ness. Whether Roll 
paints an old peasant 
showing the ravages 
of age, or a radiant 
and enchanting vis- 
ion of the nude form 
of a young maiden, 
it is in himself that 
he verifies the phil- 
osophical adage that 
" beauty is the splen- 
dour of truth." He 
shows the same deep 
passion in his pursuit 
of plastic reality as 
by alfred philippe roll when he applies him- 
self with an untiring 



Labour and Light indicate a striving for ex- energy to produce that ideal of luminous truth by 

His contemporaries 



pression, more complex, a noble uneasiness of 
a mind in quest of a higher, more comprehensive 
and human art. Also the great canvas of 1908, 
which the artist has entitled Through Nature to- 
ward Humanity, and which has taken a place in 



means of unceasing effort. 



and his rivals at times attempt to attain the same 
degree of greatness, but their audacity does not 
alarm him; on the contrarv, thev always find in 
him a sympathetic companion also seeking the 



the Sorbonne; finally the ceiling, recently placed solution of the problem, 

in the Petit Palais at Paris, where triumphs a Such a disposition as M. Roll's necessarily was 

young and audacious Republic, all in vivid red, the making of him and he has not missed his goal, 

in the midst of figures of geniuses, philosophers, that of a portrait painter of the highest order. 



sages, workmen and soldiers, which unite to form 
its cortege. 



ance of the auburn hair flowing in the sunlight, 



„,^v wit pctiK 01 j^ouis A1V a memorable on a hirk a ^»^^, ^^, m uic picbcnce ol j^on, tne certainty 01 a 

emption of a grand collective soul, exalted bv the vonn* c ^ rouncl 0± verdant nature, with the profound sincerity, a man who devotes himself 

remembrance of the great Revolutionary da y ; KttUhnr^n^ . ...... - - 

Numerous independent figures accompany these 



young bulls or colts prancing as accompanying 
ngures, had many a time fascinated him The 
Woman with the Bull in the Museum of Buenos 



great canvases which will prolong with more fresh L T ^ * the MuSCUm of Buenos 

nc and grace, if not of powef, the ™ ^IT^J™ \ l* J**. 



CXIV 



irie magnificent decoration of the City Hall of 









His academy studies were always truthful and 

veritable portraits, serious and attentive. His 

It is singular to note how much this observer, first works, like that of his mother, dated 187S, 

this painter of realistic scenes retains his individ- still cling to a style a little scholastic, which we 

noticed not long ago at the beginning of his career. 
The Child on Horseback of the Salon of 1888, one of 
his sons, is a splendid result of a period of joyous 
exuberance. The Man in Mourning, in which one 
easily recognizes the artist himself, is a living wit- 
ness of the sad episodes of his life, 
ures, already historical, reveal to us the meetings 
and the friendships which accumulate in the course 
of an active existence, intimately mingled with the 
life of a republican country. It is Jules Simon, 
Alphand, Yves Guyot, Antonin Proust, President 
Carnot and all those who figure in the canvas of 



uality; how his temperament, his state of mind, 
either momentary or deep, appears through his 
•reductions, and whose ability is so admirably 
sketched by Leon Bourgeois, the great statesman 
and far-sighted psychologist. One has from the 
first, in the presence of Roll, the certainty of a 



Numerous fig- 



entirely to his work and who has no desire to be 
distinguished except through his own efforts. 
Nature to him is an open book, inexhaustible and 
multiform; he loves every aspect of it, from the 
most crude and ordinary (which he portrays with- 



cxv 














.1 




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> I 




























> 












Living American Etchers 



The Centenary; Zola, Vacquerie, Charles Gamier, 

Dalou, etc., later President Faure, whom In- 
sketched in his villa at Sainte Adresse, and the 

young Czar Nicholas, whom he asked to \ >< >se for him 
at Tsarkoie Selo, in order to enlighten and give 
him a realistic view for the picture entitled the 
Laying of the First Stone of the Alexander Bridge. 
Later the grave and pensive figure of Leon Bour- 
geois, a work more penetrating and thoughtful, as 
contrasted with works of such high ideals and 
poetical rapture as his preceding ones, and which 
shows us the result of serious maturity in the artist 

■ 

always in quest of improvement, never satisfied 

with his achievements, however brilliant , but mov- 
ing ever on toward his highest ideal. 

The landscape also naturally tempts him, and 
these were his first inspirations. Normandy pas- 
tures or industrial suburbs, he appears always cor- 
rect and expressive throughout his works, and it is 
here that he relaxes. The sea, rough and colour- 
fill, the sky with tragic clouds or majestically calm 



must have been dead a very long time, em- 
balmed art being very popular, or he must gain 
recognition in Paris or London and rush direct 

from the American landing stage to the print 

dealer's office. A skimming process then ensues ill 

which the cream of the plates is obtained and a 

year of financial peace is assured to the artist. 

The year ended, he must turn to other pursuits or 

else rush back to Europe and perform a fresh gar 

nering of subjects for a couple of years. Such is 
the etcher's treadmill. 

But strange as it may appear, there are som< 

print lovers who do not demand thai an etcher U 
dead ov domiciled abroad; the) <»nly wish to be 

confronted with good era mplesof the art to frame 
or place in their portfolios. 

An experiment has just come to a successful 

close in which Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Veafc Brin- 

ton, of Philadelphia, collected portfolios from 

some twenty or thirty artist, and in the intimate 
surroundings of their beautiful home invited 



of , ,, . - ■ tv vi w*wj uuiiuiiui iionn invited 

at sunset, the spacious grassy gardens peopled friendsand ethers to come and see and buy The 

with clear silhouettes, or with animals at liberty: home was turned topsy tun y and for a week thes 

to these he returns mcessantly, but with diverse enthusiastic people laboured to make a hi, 

T^lZl^™^*^* that ** P «- — - bes, advantage. 



objective tranquillity which in itself is the very 
strength of a Rousseau or a Claude Monet. Roll, 
in his landscapes as in his decorations, in his scenes 
of nature, and even in his portraits, gives himself 
up entirely to his ardent, generous, audacious and 
enthusiastic temperament, his frank sympathy 
nd his poetic soul. He is a realist by education ; 
we have seen it, willingly and in theory, but he is 



On tla 

first "At Home" Mr. George T. Plowman was 
invited from Boston to demonstrate, not to lec- 
ture. In the simplest manner, surrounded by an 

interested audience and a practical outfit he ex- 
plained the different processes and showed tin- 
tools and their use.. The somewhat austere 

atmosphere and too apparent commercially of the 
gallery was conspicuous bv its absence and th. 



above all a passionate Ivric. In his clear eve. i i V ^ h >" ltS ; " *nd ** 

piercing and soft, one feelfthe. H«J^2 *?*".! **.*?" ^ found ' *** «* h 



The City College Stadium 




DETAIL OF THE CITY COLLEGE STADIUM 



ARCHITECT, ARNOLD W. BRUNNER 




piercing and soft, one feels the dream of humanity 
which is about to blossom in his expressive work, 
poignant or joyous, never impersonal nor abst ract . 
The tragic events which have thrown his 
country into confusion found Roll working at 
the border of the Forest of Fontainebleau, in 
the harmonious setting of his great garden at 
Bois-le-Roi in the distance, and the grand, 
peaceful valley of the Seine, which was to be de- 
stroyed some weeks later by the terrible tempest. 

He was completing some of his Summer Idylls. 



IVING AMERICAN ETCHERS: 

AN EXPERIMENT IN PHILADEL 
PHIA 



HE CITY COLLEGE STADIUM 
(PRESENTED TO THE CITY BY 
MR. ADOLPH LEWISOHN) 
BY JOHN H. FINLEY 



Ox Tin; Trasteverine Hill, overlooking the 
city of Rome, there is a semi-circular rock-hewn 
theatre which is the miniature model of what 



part hewn from the rock, looks out over New York 
City and on clear days across the Sound to the 
hills on the north shore of Long Island. And 



evidence that the host was not engaged in il« ging I long ago hoped might some day crown St.Nicho- 




There are two factors which make for suc- 
cess with the American etcher. Either he 



CX VI 



a dead horse, but was initiating a modu operandi 

which should command the serious attention of an 
lovers willing to make similar sacrifices, namely, 
i" give up house, time and mone) for a few .lax' 
exhibition on the same intimate lines. 
It should b aid in conclusion that etchers wen 

selected at random and only a few, just to try oul 
the idea. No etcher who was not represented 

need feel tor a moment that he was over kcd. 

As soon as a regular plan of action has been deter- 
mined upon, there will be opportunity to register 
Had tins enterprise been a failure instead of a 

marked success, the unqualified thanks of all - 

dealers, etchers and art-loving public-are due to 
the Bnntons, who have done so much to encourage 

this .delightful art as practised by living American 
etclHrs - W. H. DE B. X. 



las Heights in New York City. And now what was 
long ago hoped for is almost incredibly in actual 
existence. To be sure, it is many tens of times 
larger than the little stone-seated hill-top theatre, 
near the convent of St. Onofrio, where it is said 
Tasso used to come in his last davs to rest beneath 
a huge willow that Hung its afternoon shadow 
over the northernmost seats. Moreover, there is 
no high screen of cedars at the rear to shut it away 
from the street and give it an atmosphere of the 
academic grove. In place of the stately and som- 
bre trees, it has been necessary to build a solid 
architectural frame as a setting and for shelter from 
the late afternoon summer's sun and the noises of 
a street-car avenue. But there is this resemblance : 
that as the miniature theatre of St. Onofrio looks 
over Rome, so this new-world hill-top theatre, in 




ONE OF THE END PAVILIONS 



CXVII 







,_ 




































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Jl 






The City College Stadium 



though it has no Tasso tree, it has a memory of a 
poet whom New York should never forget, 

Richard Watson Gilder; for I recall his standing 
with me at the north-west corner of the site and 
imagining what he has not lived to see. 



would be serviceable as well as beautiful, and that 
would meet all the classical requirements while 
standing in immediate proximity to a group oi 
perpendicular Gothic buildings. 

The following facts will define the Structure 



This structure has the outlook of St. Onofrio. more fulK : 



but it has the sweep of the ellipse of the Coliseum, 
and it has, as I recall, the diameter dimension of 
the great amphitheatre at Kpidauros. Manx- 
years ago I heard a lecture on this historic theatre 
and was greatly encouraged in my labour for the 
City College theatre or stadium by learning that 
the theatre praised by Pausanias as the most 
beautiful in Greece would have fitted closely the 
plot now occupied by this most attractive, as I 
believe, of new-world stadiums. 

It is in the literal and narrow definition of the 
word not a "stadium"; nor is it in like literalness 
an amphitheatre. It is a " 



Greek professor friend of mine has called it; it is 
half an "ampin." But with its running track and 
its ball fields, it serves the purposes of a stadium, 
and with its semi-circular seats it also serves the 
purposes of an out-of-door theatre. If the other 
half of the ellipse had been added, the uses of the 
structure would have been greatly diminished and 
the view, which is an asset of incalculable value, 
would have been shut away. 

I wish the field could have been a bit larger and 
the track a bit longer, but there was no stretching 
this tract bounded by four streets, and the struc- 
ture could not well have been made smaller. 



It extends from 136th Street to 138th Street. 

along Amsterdam Avenue, and with the field, ex- 
tends from Amsterdam Avenue to Convent 

Avenue, immediately south of the City College 
buildings; it is built entirely of concrete, it > front 
age on Amsterdam Avenue 460 feet; there are 

19 rows of seats divided into io sub-divisions 

there is a Doric colonnade at the back of 64 col- 
umns 15 feet high; the semi-elliptical colonnade 

ends in two pavilions 27 feet by 23 feet inches, 
containing showers and dressing-rooms for com- 
peting teams; there are 0,000 seats and approxi- 

hemi-stade," as a mately 1 ,500 standees ; the colour of the concrete is 



is, it should not only serve the college students but 
also influence the out-of-door recreational life of 
the city, affording a place not only for practice and 
competitive college school and public games, but 
also for concerts, pageants and plays. Under the 
direction of the best organized department of 
physical training with which I am familiar, I 
anticipate that this stadium will be a great, whole- 
some civic factor. 

While it rises out of the generosity of Air. 
Adolph Lewisohn, who has built it and given it to 
the city, it takes its form from the architectural 
skill of Mr. Arnold W. Brunner, to whose genius 
American cities are becoming greatly indebted. I 
do not forget the early helpful suggestions and 
sketches of George B. Post and his sons, who de- 
signed the great college buildings in the adjoining 
blocks. Mr. Brunner, however, as Mr. Lew- 
isohn's architect, solved what seemed at first an 
insoluble problem, of making a structure that 

CX VI II 



a light grey ; the panelled wall back of columns fete 
1 >e coloured Pompeian red ;t he slope of ground from 

Amsterdam Avenue to Convent Avenue forms a 
natural amphitheatre j the spectator- face the east ; 

athletic held provides space for baseball diamond, 
football held, one-fifth of a mile running track and 

450 feet straightaway; the entire field is to be en- 
closed with light iron fence, so as not to obstruct 

the view; immediately in front, extending to th 

edge of the hill, is a park space of two blocks. 
It is a happy initial consummation that thi 

beautiful structure of classical lines should be 



As it dedicated by the performance of a Greek play. 



With its colonnade rising high on one of the high- 
est crests of the island, it will indeed be, in the 
words of Euripides, the "lit house" of the dawn. 

And some day (I have the hope now that so much 
has come) the great marble columns designed by 
Mr. Brunner will stand as a portal for the new 
day and as a monument commemorative of the 
glory of the days that have been. 




' 1 • 



ALVOR BAGGE COLLECTION Al 
THE EHRICH GALLERIES 



This collection was made by Mr. Halvor 
Bagge during many years spent in Greece assist- 
ing in archaeological excavations in Knossos, 
Delhi and Sparta. Becoming interested in 
Byzantine art he formed this unique collection 
which has just been brought to this country. 
The collection has already been shown in 
Chnstiania and Copenhagen. 








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Academy New York Spring Exhibition, iqi 5 



LA MIDINETTE 

BY ALBERT ROSENTHAL 





The Edmund Davis Collection — // 

HE EDMUND DAVIS COLLEC- Shannon's Les Marmitons—a. painting of two slim 
TION. BY T.MARTIN WOOD. I 



(Second Article.) 

When a collector is animated by sensibility to 
eauty in making his collection it is impossible 
that he will not soon discover the unreality of the 
distinctions generally drawn between ancient and 
modern art, an unreality exposed in the fact that 
the division between the two is hardly ever found 
in the same place by two critics. In our first 
article, writing of the Old Masters in Mr. Davis's 
possession, we referred to his collection as a whole 
as the result of self-expression. Works of art 
assembled on such a natural system will not only 
reveal the collector's mind but define the character 



children wearing silk knee-breeches and frilled 
shirts, one of them wearing a white hat similar to 
that used by cooks. It is on record that this 
picture charmed Whistler. It certainly reflects 
his influence, revealing the exceptional sensitive- 
ness to quality in paint which imparted grace to 
everything of his own. The painting is executed 
with freedom, and it captures a beauty peculiar to 
the liquid method in which the paint is applied. 
The highest finish characterises it ; this, however, 
has not been secured as an after-process ; it is the 
logical result of the manipulation throughout. 
The picture is romantic. The characteristic of 
romantic art is that in spirit it cannot be referred 
to any particular time. The costume does not in 



of his influence in his time. We referred to the any but a superficial sense date the subject, and 



artist's dependence on the patron, but of as much 
reality and importance is 
the patron's dependence 
on the artist, for the ex- 
pression of himself. 

An artist by the indi- 
vidual quality of his genius 
is often destined to loneli- 
ness, but in the end he 
has experience to contrast 
with common ones which, 
if he can but communicate 
them, will increase the 
range of subjective experi- 
ence possible to those who 
study him, and thus he will 
add to their world. This 
is creation. But the type 
of artist to whom so much 
is owed will be the last who 
can choose his public; his 
public must find him. 

If there are two artists 
at this moment who have 
not made concessions to 
win a public which is not 
their natural one they are 
Charles Ricketts and 
Charles Shannon. We take 
pleasure then in finding 
their pictures confronting 
us immediately we cross 
the threshold of the house 
containing the collection 
we are describing. 

As a centre panel of the 
hall of the house hangs "mother and child" 

LV. No. 220. — June 19 15 



the date of execution is the thing we think of last. 




BY CHARLES SHANNON, A.R.A 

229 




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1 









































"THE DEATH OF CLEOPATRA" 
BY CHARLES RICKETTS 








BY WILLIAM ORPEN, A.R.A. 




1' I 



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A.'' 



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1 




The Edmund Davis Collection— 1 1 



It is seldom enough that a modern picture secun 
this transcendental result, but in that direction lies 
the secret of the enchantment of costume as de 
picted in ancient art. 

From the point of view of strict criticism of 
painting it may seem, at first, somewhat absurd to 

suggest that just a little additional glamour, valuahl- 

to the picture itself, may lie with the diJ rem 
between the use of the fanciful title Les Marmitom 

and its plebeian translation. The more fanciful 
sounding French is in agreement with the qualities 
of the picture, for there is relationship between the 
imagery that words evoke and forms madetangibl< 

in painting. Indeed apoem'and a picture may be 
related in a sense in which two paintings are not, 
and to overlook relationships of this abstract kind 
between the arts is to lose the key to everything 
temperamental : in criticism it is to knock at closed 
doors, and come away only with a report on the 
varnish. 



quality all its own. Hut we nu\ Bay of the finisl 

version that it is almost impossible to think i 

another modem i anvas in which a quality of paini 

that Whistler identified with work direct fi 
nature is empl< d im. natively with only 

indirect referei to actuality. 

The collection contains on < f Charles Ricki 
most important pictui The Death of Cleopa 

In a lofty hall ( falls, pi sing the S 

her b: St, while two women hasten to sup 
her. The scene is removed from tuality 

not to "the stage it is repl nted in a pla 
f shadows, where the Ql n's uncovered fi 

read\- seems to glow with supernatural light. i 
In the art of both Rtckettsand Shannon w. 
truth to nature reverenced chiefly 1>> rose of 

mind's dependence on nature for its iina 
their paintings show pictorial logic. The exj 
they revi I is more than visual, many impi 

meet in thi i almost mystically r< < eived. 



The title of a picture counts for something : it Besid< the i \w decorated by the lab I ha 

may induce the very mood 

in which the picture should 

be approached. In the 

case of this picture we 

feel we should be able to 

identify the children with 

some romance, but find it 

impossible to remember a 

story in connection with 

them. Thev have the 

character of visitants, but 

they do not come from 
another world. 

In addition to the above 
work of Shannon's there are 
the Mother and Child, the 

Wood Nymph (a small ver- 
sion of a subject he has 
repeated), the companion 
portraits of Ricketts and 
himself, called respectively 
The Man in the Black 
Coat and The Man in the 
Black Shirt ; a painting 
Tilntllus in the House of 
Delia, and a small study in 
colour for Les Marmitons^ 
in which the figures arc- 
altered in pose. This last 
is very pleasant and light 
in execution, and exqui- 
sitely fresh in colour, and 
its spontaneity gives it a 

2 3 2 BY J. E. BLAN* HE 




< t 



GIRL IN white " 




" THE DOCTOR." BY JAMES PRVDE 




■ 



4 - 









- I'", I 



-«v 



■ (••' 1 



■ ivl 



HHH^H 




The Edmund Davis Collection — II 







-I i 




























/ 










It is seldom enough that a modern picture secures 
this transcendental result, but in that direction lies 
the secret of the enchantment of costume as de- 
picted in ancient art. 

From the point of view of strict criticism of 
painting it may seem, at first, somewhat absurd to 
suggest that just a little additional glamour, valuable 
to the picture itself, may lie with the difference 
between the use of the fanciful title Les Marmitons 
and its plebeian translation. The more fanciful 
sounding French is in agreement with the qualities 
of the picture, for there is relationship between the 
imagery that words evoke and forms made tangible 
in painting. Indeed apoeirfand a picture may be 
related in a sense in which two paintings are not, 
and to overlook relationships of this abstract kind 
between the arts is to lose the key to everything 
temperamental ; in criticism it is to knock at closed 
doors, and come away only with a report on the 
varnish. 

The title of a picture counts for something ; it 
may induce the very mood 
in which the picture should 
be approached. In the 
case of this picture we 
feel we should be able to 
identify the children with 
some romance, but find it 
impossible to remember a 
story in connection with 
them. They have the 
character of visitants, but 
they do not come from 
another world. 

In addition to the above 
work of Shannon's there are 
the Mother and Child, the 
Wood Nymph (a small ver- 
sion of a subject he has 
repeated), the companion 
portraits of Ricketts and 
himself, called respectively 
The Mci7i in the Black 
Coat and The Man in the 
Black Shirt; a painting 
Tibullus in the House of 
Delia, and a small study in 
colour for Les Marmitons, 
in which the figures are 
altered in pose. This last 
is very pleasant and light 
in execution, and exqui- 
sitely fresh in colour, and 
its spontaneity gives it a 
232 



quality all its own. But we may say of the finish^ 
version that it is almost impossible to think \ 
another modern canvas in which a quality of pain| 
that Whistler identified with work direct frou 
nature is employed imaginatively with only ar 
indirect reference to actuality. 

The collection contains one of Charles Rickett 
most important pictures, The Death of CleopaU 
In a lofty hall Cleopatra falls, pressing the asp t, 
her breast, while two women hasten to supp< 
her. The scene is removed from actuality— h 
not to "the stage"; it is represented in a place 
of shadows, where the Queen's uncovered flesh 
already seems to glow with supernatural light. 

In the art of both Ricketts and Shannon we find 
truth to nature reverenced chiefly because of the 
mind's dependence on nature for its imagery. But 
their paintings show.pictorial logic. The experience 
they reveal is more than visual, many impressions 
meet in them almost mystically received. 

Besides the room decorated by the late Char!,. 




GIRL IN WHITE " 



BY J. E. BLANCHE 




• i 



THE DOCTOR." BY JAMES PRYDE 



, * 




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X* 



"THE LADY IN MUSLIN 
BY FRANK H. POTTER 



"THE YELLOW DRESS" 
BY PHILIP CONNARD 















The Edmund Davis Collection — II 






ail 














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Conder, the house contains several works on 
silk and an oil picture of the Esplanade at 
Brighton from his hand. Before his decorations 



we are always present at the actual scene of his 
thoughts ; no paraphernalia of the studio is brought 
between us and this immediate iecord of his mental 
vision, and in such art we pass into the world of 
another and experience life as it presented itself to 
him. This capacity to command the mood of the 
spectator is probably the quality that more than any 
other pertains to enduring art. 

In a house made dreamy by the work of the 
imaginative artists whose paintings we have just 
described, it is not unpleasant to encounter byway 
of contrast the sharp definition of Philip Connard's 
picture The Yellow Dress. Artists of his kind, 
who unmask beauty in actuality, receive their 
impressions not unemotionally, and we must be on 
our guard against defining their art as objective. 
Painting in which feeling is apparent is subjective ; 
in fact we may say that painting begins to be art 
when it begins to be subjective. 

It is an altogether different type of picture that 
shows itself in the painting by James Pryde called 
The Doctor. Like Hogarth, 
Pryde can never quite sup- 
press the note of satire in 
his work. His themes of 
sombre title and grandiose 
effect are comedies. He 
does everything to dwarf 
human figures and reveal 
their helplessness in con- 
trast with the monumental 
and enduring architecture 
and the substantial furniture 
which are the work of their 
hands. It is in the shadow 
of these edifices that 
destiny seems to wait for 
them while it deceives them 
with a smile. 

. As we remember the can- 
vases, Walter Sickert's 
Venice hangs near to the 
Pryde. Nature is always 
seen by Sickert through the 
temperamental veil. With- 
out the intention of depart. 
>ng from the scene before 
him his representations 
convey little that is of 
merely local importance. 

the most commonplace 
236 



thing assumes some significance from his inter- 
pretation. 

A picture to be remembered is The Girl i n 
White by J. E. Blanche. In a white pinafore, she 
leans back in her chair, lost in reverie, her figure 
reflected in a near mirror. The swift and sensitive 
description of exterior detail is not weakened by 
the almost literary mood that prevails. The collec- 
tion also contains a portrait from M. Blanche's 
hand. 

We must not forget to record the landscape 
Dieppe, by the Canadian painter, James Morrice, of 
infinitely tender colour, a nature-lover's rendering 
of coast atmosphere— and some garden scenes by 
Miss Emma Ciardi, painted with an air of gaiety 
that is delightful. 

We remember the music-room for, among other 
things, some old chairs with silk covers painted by 
the collector's wife. Those who have seen Mrs. 
Davis's fans have found in them an instinct for the 
requirement of the fan only little less certain than 
was that of Conder. The charm of the touch of 
Mary Davis with a water-colour brush rests with its 
feminine delicacy : she is to Conder what Berthe 




LES MARMITONS " 



BY CHARLES SHANNON, A.R.A 



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THE CREATION OF EVE 
by G. F. WATTS. R A. 



•DENUNCIATION. 
by G F. WATTS, R.A. 




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"VENICE " 



Morisot was to Manet, not an imitator but one 
unconsciously transforming the style of a chosen 
master to the character of her sex. We believe 
that a woman's art cannot take high place when it 
can be confounded with a man's. 

In a passage leading from the hall to the Conder 
room a set of coloured drawings by Mr. Edmund 
Dulac is framed behind Japanese lacquer panels, 
which open and reveal a fantastic story in the 
style of the Japanese, and in the hall itself there is 
a painting by Constance Halford which well re- 
presents her exceptional colour. There, too, 
hangs a rather early painting by Orpen, depicting 
a girl reclining in a cushioned chair near a window, Impressionism was at its height, and when a re- 

her arms above her head ; outside the window sponsiveness to the mood of nature was cultivated 
twilight creates a deep blue, in contrast to the as never before or since. Nothing was then done 

242 



BY WALTER SICKERT 

glow of the lamp-lit room. The effect is peculiarly 
happy even for Mr. Orpen, whose skill is unsur- 
passed in problems of the kind. 

The collection contains a small interior piece 
called The Lady in Muslin, by F. H. Potter. 
This painter died in 1887, and at his death his 
art had not obtained the reputation it deserved. 
It sometimes approaches the work of Stevens, the 
Belgian, in its delicacy. There are two paintings by 
G. F. Watts ; the Creation of Eve and Denunciation. 
These are reproduced in colour with this article. 

Our colour reproductions also include La Plage 
by Boudin. Boudin lived at the moment when 

















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"L'ETERNEL PRINTEMPS" OR 
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for mere effect, and yet every effect that nature 
would suggest was studied. Impressionism is art of 
the most animated kind, its soul is movement ; in 
mpressiomsm the effect is always passing. And 
that >s why what it recorded seemed worth record- 
ing ; what ,t arrested might never occur again, or 
the amst mmd might not be there, sensitive as an 
*ohan stnng, to receive the beauty that was passing. 
Boudin was born at Honfleur in 1824. His 
father was a pilot, and he began life as a cabin-boy 

hewpamters haveshown a finer sense of atmosphere 
hen w e ask Qm ^ by ^ ^ ^J ^ 

that of impressionism he could have realised on 
anvas ; that of which he had the secret we are at a 
oss what to reply. Every school of painting pre 
^ r formo ft r Uthwhicht J scho i^ 

The Queen Henrietta Maria by Van Dyck the 

TlorTltT ° a> Came fr ° m the Collectio " 
"Lord Lansdowne. It is considered by several 

:: t ties T a h s ^r** ° f « «*» -pir; 

Portrait l he Queen's figure in this pose also 

^44 



BY AUGUSTE RODIN 

appears with that of Charles in the group of 

Charles I receiving a myrtle wreath from Henrietta 
Maria. 

With the illustrations to the present article are 
also included three works by Rodin which belong to 
the .coUtction- L'Eternel Printemps or L' Amour 
et Psyche; Les Voix; and L 'Illusion Pris/e ; but we 
propose to deal textually with the sculpture and 
the drawings of the collection in a separate article. 

1 he encouragement that Mr. Davis has given to 
artists must not be estimated only by the pictures 
m his house. All that is most representative of 
the vitality of painting in England at this moment 
will be represented in France, in the Musee du 
Luxembourg, by a gift from this collector. This 
present to the French Government, to which Mr. 
Davis constantly adds and which now amounts to no 
fewer than thirty pictures, will be hung in a special 
room at the Luxembourg. It was intended to open 
a temporary exhibition there last December, pend- 
ing the preparation of the room, but owing to the 
unfortunate conditions that now prevail on the 
Continent this project has been postponed. 





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An English Artisfs Impressions of New York 




City on Earth." If height means greatness, it is 
decidedly the greatest. The enormous buildings, 
soaring skywards, have a fascination by day and 
night, and leave a quite unforgettable impression. 
The American architect has great opportunities 
and makes wise use of them. To begin with, he 
works on a scale that is most impressive, even in 
a warehouse. When these dignified masses of 
apparently solid masonry are topped with a fine 
arcade, balcony or bold cornice, sometimes gilt, 
there is effective light, shade and colour. Silhouetted 
visit to a oreat modern American city and hoped or standing out clearly against the luminous skies, 



ENGLISH ARTIST'S IMPRES- 
SIONS OF NEW YORK. BY 
\wLL1AM MONK, R.E.. 

Great cities have always appealed to me, and 
when I was offered a commission by a well-known 
publisher to etch some plates of New York, it gave 
me much pleasure to contemplate a new experience. 
Believing that architects, painters, sculptors and 
etchers ought to express their own times if their 
work is to be of value, I looked forward to my 



to find a comparatively unworked mine of new 

subjects. 

The first glimpse from the bows of the liner was 

enough to convince me that I had not been 
mistaken in my expectations. The wonderful mass 
and outline, faint and dim in the morning light 



there is something which cannot be found in any 
other city building. For instance, the Metro- 
politan Tower (white marble), the Bankers' Trust 
Building, the Liberty Tower, and the largest and 
latest Wool worth Building, have a dignity and 
decorative value equal to any of the old work ; and 



opal grey on the rim of the sea — is a sight that is they also have a character distinctively their own. 
not easily forgotten, and makes one understand at The Singer Tower is not, perhaps, all that it might 
once the proud New Yorkers' title "The Greatest be in detail, but has a slender, graceful effect, and 




<< 



A NIGHT EFFECT" 



WATER-COLOUR BY WILLIAM MONK, R.E 

247 



























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^* English Artisfs Impressions of New York 



is of the greatest value in composing the mighty 
mass of buildings. 

New York, like a greater Venice, rises out of the 
sea, and this is another enormous artistic advantage. 
The pale blues, greens, and changing greys of the 
sea, and the reflections of the buildings broken by 
the creamy wakes of the numerous strange ferry- 
boats and other craft, together with the wreaths of 
vapour and smoke against the lofty architecture, 
give material for endless pictures. Under certain 
effects the detail of the modern buildings is lost 
or becomes delicate tracery, while the light of the 
sun reflected in the countless windows conveys a 
gleaming, jewel-like effect. From a little distance 
subjects may be found as exquisite and beautiful 
m colour and composition as in the most poetic 
dreams of Turner in his latest and best period 



Rrver are to Bnt.sh eyes most novel and interest,^ 
The huge hners are pushed and persuaded il 
their berths by a crowd of small tugs, and when 
res they are not unlike a line of racers i„ t J 
stalls. The tugs are sturdy and have an unus 
important air. Unlike similar craft on our w 
ways, they are accustomed to take great scow, 
barges on either side; and to enable their skipped 
o see over their charges, these tugs have high 1 
out cabins covered in with glass. Usually there!" 
a carved and gilt American eagle on the top. Th 
ides are protected by pieces of timber which look 
rather hke the oars of an ancient galley. The w 
known American yachts and schooners, ben 
over gracefully and sailing almost in the y e of 







Indeed the distant views' of" the^™ ^JST^T^^ l ™* **C 

recalled Turner to me and this impression remained 
in my mind during the whole of my stay. It is 

surprising, perhaps, that so modern a city should 

suggest Turner in this way, but it does so. cleverMf . _, " — * —« Janvier, the 

The various craft on the Sound and the Hudson T^ZZT^™ °! «* *** — «J 

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. w ' wcu wur * a most delict 

green patI or the bd rf Ja 

background, many hne subjects are to hand 

bvZ V? NW Y ° rk TOS made most enjoyable 
by the kmdness of the late Thomas Janvier the 

eleverest writer and one of the best m ' * 
companions ,t has been my fortune to know. 




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NEW YORK QUAY" 
248 



WATER-COLOUR BY 



WILLIAM MONK, R. E . 




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An English Artisfs Impressions of New York 



had met some years before when we both lived at 
Hampstead. He was most surprised to find me 
in New York and at once insisted that I should be 
put up as a visitor at his club, the Century, which 
was for the rest of my stay almost my home. After 
my somewhat rough passage across the Atlantic 
and my daily sketching in the none too quiet 
streets of New York, the delightful rooms of the 
Club were indeed "rest after stormy seas." I very 
much appreciated the club and the kindness of 
the members. In the evenings Mr. Janvier was 
frequently my companion. He was greatly interested 
and amused by some of my adventures and con- 
versations while sketching. The friendly interest 
taken in my work by dignified bankers and still 
more dignified police was most gratifying. 1 
mentioned this to Janvier as one of the charming 
points of the American character. He laughed 



from the central heating boilers have a curious a 
interesting effect, floating across the high buildij 
and breaking the upright lines most usefully. « \ 
town," which corresponds to our West End, has ' 
almost Parisian feeling: indeed, one is constant! 
reminded of Paris in Fifth Avenue. Here J 
art dealers have their palatial galleries, she-win! 
their works with every advantage of setting J 
lighting. to c 




and turned a neat compliment, to which I replied, 
that I might sketch for a very long time outside 
any English bank before being invited inside to 
show the drawing. 

The street effects in New York are most striking 
in every way. No soft coal is burned there and the 
buildings remain bright and clean. 



The illustrations to this article are representative 
though they suffer somewhat from reduction 
should have liked to give more of the distant views 
but as they depend a great deal on colour thev 
are difficult to reproduce. My plate «,f Brookln 
Bridge from below is not included. The conner 
was sold to a German publisher just before L 
unfortunate war and is therefore not available 
but a small sketch of the structure from another 
point is included here. The bridge is, perhaps 
one of the finest subjects in New York, quite epic' 
m scale and grandeur. The great foreshortened 
cables would have appealed to Piranesi. Other 
subjects, such as the building of the Great Central 
Station, the Wool worth and Municipal Buildin 




■ 6 o * milium uiiu.ni ana clean Down tnmn «i„~ • , *"~ -^"*»ji 

*■ effects are a tittle more sombre, as the bl^ 1^ ^ *« *? — -™i sug 
are higher. In cold weather the wreaths of steam 



est 



compositions in the Grand Manner. One sees a 
huge Corinthian capital hanging in mid air, with 



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BROOKLYN BRIDGE" 

2 5° 



WATER-COLOUR BY WILLIAM MONK, R. E . 






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THE STOCK EXCHANGE, NEW YORK" 
WA?ER-COLOUR BY WILLIAM MONK, R.E. 



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An English Artist \s Impressions of New ) r ork 



three or four workmen standing on it in the easy 
unconcerned classic poses which are perfectly 
natural to them : and it makes one wish that a 
public could be found who would encourage artists 
to record these subjects. 

The night effects from the Sound and the river 
are very beautiful and unique. Nowhere else in 
the world can such a sight be seen as the lighted 
express lifts rising to the tops of the dark sky- 
scrapers like a succession of rockets. The illumin- 
ated advertisements in Broadway are most startling, 
and whatever one may think of such means of 
publicity it must be admitted that they are un- 
commonly well done in New York. A great 
chariot race is seen in full colour with horses 
galloping and cloaks fluttering. Above this, at 
intervals, advertisements flash out announcing 
somebody's revolvers or chewing gum. Then 
there is the face of a girl in outline, high up 
in the air, with a winking eye. Pierrots throw 
coloured balls across to each other and there are 
countless other designs. And the searchlights 
suddenly make vast towers appear out of the 
darkness. The problems of colour and the bold 
effects of light and shade given by modern electric 
lighting offer endless possibilities, and the illumin- 
ated advertisements, however nerve shattering, 
often come effectively into the scheme. 



My impressions of New York concern the archi- 
tecture and setting, the figure interest bring 
subordinated : but the human side would form 

material lor many illustrated articles. Tlie types 
white and coloured, seen about the quaysalongth 

Hudson River and in the streets loading to them 

are splendidly picturesque. Ellis Island t 
with fine subjects and for the man wholifo mod, n 

society types there are Fifth Avenue and i mtral 

Park, almost ultra modem. 

Being so much occupied with the City itself I 
had not the timi to much of the surroundi 
countr\. Mr. Kenneth Frazier, a portrait painl r 

and old Bushey student, invited me for a week-end 
to his house at West Point, and on the way thitl r 

I had glimpses of the Palisad and small towi 

West Point itself is hilly, with fine tiinln md rod 
streams, most promising for landscape work. Ti e 
Military College is a tine group of modern (iothic 
buildings which fall most happily into harmony with 

the rocky Palisades. The country houses in v. 
district have the old Colonial feelin and a great 

air of comfort and distinction. I was driven in 

a "Buckboard w and made acquaintance win 

American country s s which have interested n 

in American magazines for years and I was most 
fortunate to see something of them under such 
pleasant conditions. 




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FROM BROOKLYN BRIDGE 53 (ETCHING) 

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{By ptrmi n ofthr pufrlithrrs ofthf ."./ 
Plate, Arthur ?>n*zi:n t*nd Son I.;d. % 

157A New B : and Xcw YerM) 



•FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORI 

ETCHING BY WILLIAM MONK, R.E. 



BY WILLIAM MONK, R.K. 



















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l?cmNG TR R°v P w r I T T T AN T0WER - NEW Y ORK 

1LHING BY WILLIAM MONK, R.E. 



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ETCHING BY W. MONK. RE- 






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Belgian Artists in England 

ELGIAN ARTISTS IN ENG- the Flemish painters are upholding worthily i 
LAND. BY DR. P. BUSCHMANN. traditions ()f thcir glorious an< tors, but b id( 



(Third Article.)* 

Burlington House opened its doors to the 
refugee artists, and the Belgian Section formed an 
important part of the War Relief Exhibition held 
there early this year. It was a very hard task, 
under present circumstances, to collect an ensembi 
worthy of the contemporary art movement in 
Belgium. Fortunately some excellent examples, 
chiefly sculpture, happened to be in Great Britain 
before war broke out, having been lately on view at 
the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts, thi 
Aberdeen Art Gallery and elsewhere, and in addition 
the Belgian Art Section of the Exposition Inter- 
nationale Urbaine at Lyons was available. The 
Belgian artists in England contributed of course 
their best works at hand, and thus the committee, 
assisted by the indefatigable 
M. Paul Lambotte, Direc- 
teur des Beaux-Arts, sue- I 
ceeded in bringing together 
an interesting collection of 
modern Belgian art. 

The sculpture occupying 
the whole of the Central 
Hall and also displayed in 
the other galleries, formed 
undoubtedly the most at- 
tractive part of the exhi- 
bition, and reflected, in 
fact, one of the most striking 
features of contemporary 
Belgian art. In modern 
times painting is generally 
regarded as the art par 
excellence. Painters are far 
more numerous than sculp- 
tors and their works occupy 
the largest and best spaces 
in the exhibitions as well 
as in the public interest, 
whilst many of the " sculp- 
ture halls" are usually 
avoided as places of dread- 
ful tediousness— often with 
good reason ! 

In Belgium, the relation 
is not quite so. Certainly. 

* The first and second articles 
appeared in our issues of De- 
cember 1914 and February 1915 
respectively. 

260 



them there has arisen a school of sculptors who 
dt Tve full attention and have largely Contributed 

to the reputation of the national art. We may say 

indeed that Flemish originality has perhaps 1 
pi id itself with more Strength in sculpture than 

in contemporary painting. Many of the statues and 

reliefs adorning public plac , cemeteries, govern 

ment buildings and even private houses in I; jiun 
arc by no 1 ans soulless, conventional omamenl 

manufactured tor offii lal u according to acadenn 

prescriptions, but 1 ! works of art admirably supple- 
menting the collections in the galleries. Belgiui 

certainly ranks next to France in the great evolution 

of modern sculpture. 

This movement originated almost half a centur 
ago, when some young sculptors 1 ilutely r< >lted 
,'ainst a lifeless tradition which still imposed up 1 







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l'immortalit!" 



BY I'ACI, dk VKiN 



















«LE GRISOtT (FIRE-DAMP) 
BY CONST ANTIN MEUNIER 



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DAVID 



55 



BY CH. VAN DER STAPPEN 



them as paragons of beauty the sculptures of the 
late Roman period. They went to Florence, became 
enraptured with the bronze-casters of the quattro- 
cento and, what is better, came to a closer study of 
nature. They thoroughly regenerated the decayed 
art in their country, and soon produced works in 
which their strong native qualities were happily 

refined and completed by Florentine delicacy and 
elegance. 

t Some of these now deceased masters were repre- 
sented in Burlington House: Paul de Vigne 
Charles van der Stappen, Julien Dillens, the last- 
named being somewhat younger than the others. 
One cannot imagine a more idealised and refined 
work than the Immortalize by de Vigne, of which a 
fragmentary bronze cas was exhibited. The com 
plete statue, intended as a funeral monument for 
the painter L. de Winne, is in marble and belongs 
to the Brussels Museum. The full-length figure 
262 to 



with one hand raised to h wn, is leaning on a 

column, and admirably expresses deep sorrow 
mitigated b) resignation and confidence in eternal 
life. The artist's name was to be found on tin. 
other works in the exhibition : a figure of Marni 

t St. Aid U — a prominent persoi •< in Belgian 

history — a bronze Vidoire and a Portrait. 

Charles van der Stappen is perhaps moi nervou 

ml mon of a realist than tin- extremely refined 
de Vigne; ye\ Ik- did not escape Italian influenn 
as proved In his vigorous and slender statue 1 
the youth Da /, < ainly one 0! the best personi 
fieations of the biblical hero. A small group, 

St. Martin and the Bi at\ and a Portrait bust b 
the same master were also exhibited. 

The very distinctive art of Julien Dillens wa 

not sufficiently characteri d by the pi.: ter m lei 

of statuettes {Lansquenets). The bronze east 

surmounting the gable of the Maison du Roi in 




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VICTOIRE " 



BY VICTOR ROUSSEAU 




.•LENCENS." BY FERNAND KHNOPFF 






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LE PROFESSEUR CHANDEI.O.N 






BY 1 [AS VIM »T7 



disco 1 . in hi llptlll j n 

fact, his art ran far beyond I y 

doctrine and appeals to j 

human . If Gt (| 

damp), here exhibit I, must have 

touched many a heart, espt 
now when tl 188 of Bturd) 

or husbands lie s !r bed On ti 
field, and thousands of women 

heartbroken in Bpeechlea grief. 

LS, m«!( \ a great * and 

that will he eloquent !| | 

like the noblest PUth concen 

any □ r of th e . 

to the t phalanx of Ltvi] 

ulptors we note I facqu. 

de Lalaing, the author of the 1 

tiful men 1 m Hru 

in honour of the English , 

wl U in the battle of \\ at 



Brussels are decoratively effective at this height, 
but seen at a short distance they appear »mewhat 
superficial ; and the same remark may be applied 
to his Hiraut de Glide and L Art Flamand. 

A complete antithesis to these artists would 
have been found in their contemporarv Jef 
Lambeaux, rather a materialist, untouched by any 
spiritual aspiration, but in his overwhelm- 
ing power of realisation one of the 
strongest figures in Belgian art. Un- 
fortunately, he was not represented in 
the exhibition at Burlington House. 

Constantin Meunier holds a place of 
his own in Belgian-and in European- 
art. Although belonging to the same 
generation, he cannot be mentioned 
amongst the sculptors just referred to 
He was a painter for the greater part of 
his career, and only began to produce his 
world-renowned sculptures at an advanced 
age. He was ever an enthusiastic ad- 
mirer of Greek and Italian masters, and 
intimately penetrated the secrets of their 

art ; but no direct influence of any kind 
can be traced in his work ; he expressed 

h;s own strong personality, and before all 

his infinite pity for suffering mankind. 

fie d M 1 dld Wjth the PeaSant - the 
held, Meumer revealed us the beautv 

and magnitude of the modern toiler 
performing his daily task deep down in 
dark coal-pus or in cyclopean ironworks 
Socialistic tendencies might have been , 

204 



"'■ ««« ' '1 here by tbn 

bl ' Sou ! " J hi Portrm 

Thomas Vu m unrivalled portraitist, wonder 

fully combmc, .ological expn , with 

thorough study form and m, 
hibited the vivid bust of Pro, , ,„/,/„„ 

a mighty torso of a Triton, a study for a founlau 
,n the Cll;lteau d'Ai nne. \\ . ion further 




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MO'i HER AND cilll.it 



BY PAUL DUBOIS 



so strikingly represented ; the absence 
of some of the leading masters was 
sensibly felt — Stobbaerts, Courtens 
Frederic, and Laermans, to quote only a 
few names, being badly missed, while 
other noted painters, such as A. 
Baertsoen, X. Mellery, Ch. Mertens were 
only able to contribute some minor 
' works. Nevertheless the section con- 
tained some good pictures fully de- 
serving the interest of the English public. 
Amongst the painters we noted before 
all Emile Claus, who showed an im- 
portant canvas, Apple Gathering, painted 
in rather a high key, but full of sun- 
shine and vibrating atmosphere. Marcel 
JefTerys' Fete des Ballo?is, revealing the 
influence of French neo-impressionism, 
might have gained by being painted 
on a more reduced scale. Alexandre 
Marcette contributed some of his 
masterly water-colours from Flanders, 
Ypres, Middelkerke, Westende, &c, and 

I Isidore Opsomer views of Lierre, his 

native town, which so heavily suffered 
Jules Lagae, author oi the great national Monu- from bombardment; Emil Vloors a sketch for a 
ment in Buenos Ayres, who was represented by wall-decoration HAge (Tor, and a portrait of a little 
th " busts: T//r scuhtor Julien Dillens, his girl Marie Louise, of sumptuous colouring and 
masl Monsieur Lequime, and the Flemish priest elegant touch. Miss Alice Ronner, daughter of the 
and popular - itor, Hugo Verriest; 

Paul Dubois with a group, Mother and I 

Child, A Passing Shadow^ and Medita- 
tion; Godefroid de Vreese, one of the 
very first Belgian medallists, here repre- 
sented by a remarkable selection of 

medals and plaquettes. Egide Rom- 

baux, Ch. Samuel, P. Braecke, Rik 
Wouters and Aug. Puttemans complete 

this ensemble with many excellent works 

which we cannot mention in detail. 

Several Belgian sculptors who are 
now residing in England and have been 

a1 ' referred to in the preceding 

articles, were again in evidence at the 

Academy; before ail Victor Rousseau 

who besides his Girl with the Flo. ,- 

' 'oire and COffrande, exhibited I 

' "i clay sketches modelled in Eng- 

1:1,1,1 : F *ans Huygelen, who showed tfce 

Taxan r reproduced in our February 

issue; Jo/ueI)upona.W,^ ;Ge 

Minne several strong! v .studied Busts- 
Paul \\ tssaert, medals and bas-reliefs 

As a whole, Belgian painting was not 

266 




ROSES " 



BY ALICE RONNER 



Belgian Artists in England 




"CANAL EN FLANDRE 



55 



V CM: GILSOUL 



Burlington House were Man Blieck, Alb. ( )laes, 
Andre Clu naer, EmUe Fabry, M. N 

The committee also sip d in obti lini 

some works from artists residing abroad. Thu 
Victor Gilsoul, who is now living in Holland and 
is one of the 1 : vigorous Flemish 
painters, contributed a vi rofthe A 
wry good version of on< of his fa> 1 them. 

Comte Jacques de Lalaing, already menti ed 

amongst the sculptors, Is also an ninent poi til 

studies: Koses ana te riaieau ae tautu, -a^. am ngs 

however to show her new conception, tending painter; Ins tivelj Jottnut 

to extreme simplification both of harmony and Lalaing was c^rtam y « he. bnMnt 



late Henritte Ronner, so well-known as a painter 
of cats, has for many years ranked amongst 
the very first painters of still-life, and one might 
have expected that she would simply continue in 
the manner which brought her so much well- 
deserved success. But all at once she decided 
to make a change, and proved to have the courage 
as well as the power to alter her style. She 
exhibited only two small works, in the nature ot 
studies : Roses and le Plateau de laque, sufficient 



technique ; composed on a scale of two or three 



pictures of the exhibil Fernand Khnopff,well 

known to the read. of Tin, STUDIO, showed hi 



tints only, the effect is obtained by a few broad, *™»™££ " .. " ./ W di don 
bold touches, rendering 5 the very structure of tbrngs ^g^nSs noble inspirations and hi 

unrivalled skill in rendering precious n, 
Alfred Verhaeren, the painter of still-life, had 
only one small work: U Tapis rouge; A, 

Donnay, one of the 1( lers ai the Walloo 

artists contributed ral little land apes fi 
die Meuse valley, executed in Lis particular tap -try- 



before the artist's sensible eye. 

Several artists exhibited works painted during 
their exile on British soil — Charles Mertens 
some landscape-sketches and an English interior, 
The Hall; Jean Delville several well-studied 
portraits ; Pierre Paulus some London views, in 
which he proved himself a sensible interpreter of 
the special atmosphere of the Thames. Amongst 
other noteworthy refugee painters represented at 



like style. , 

The series of black-and-white works included 

267 


















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"MME. LA COMTESSE DE LAI »l»r 
BV COMTE JACQUES dI lIlaIng 



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Be /guru Artists in England 



everal good specimens, especially the masterly 
tchings by Albert Baertsoen and Jules de Bruycker, 
produced in a former issue. Victor Gilsoul like- 
wise proved his exceptional skill as an etcher, both 
in black-and-white and in colours ; La Seme a 
mricy UEgUsede Delft 'and before all Malines sous 
la Niegt, with the majestic cathedral now so badly 
damaged by German shells, awakened particular 
interest. The beauty of the old Flemish towns 
spe lly attracts the aquafortists ; Isidore Opsomer, 
Marten van der Loo, and Julien Celos showed pic- 
turesque views of Bruges, Ghent, Malines, Lierre, 
&c. whilst Albert Delstanche exhibited some 



of Marten van der Loo's etchings in colour at 
Messrs. Goupil and Co.'s Gallery, and the Belgian 
contribution to the exhibition of the Royal Institute 
of Painters in Water-Colours, where a dozen Belgian 
aquarellists were represented— H. Cassiers, J. Celos, 
Ed. Claes, A. Hamesse, F. van Holder, C. Jacquet, 
F. KhnoprT, A. Lynen, A. Marcette, V. Uytterschaut 
and E. Vloors ; we noticed especially some ex- 
cellent studies of monks and interiors of churches 
by Alfred Delaunois, the painter of Louvain. 

The exhibition of the National Portrait Society 
at the Grosvenor Gallery, and a special Belgian 
exhibition in the National Museum of Wales at 



vv*- - • ■ - 

•--11- studied landscapes, Mine. Danse - Destree Cardiff, are very important as containing contri- 

pxccllent interpretations of ancient sculpture, and butions by eminent artists whom we have not 

• * i 1 • 1 111 IT T~? T ' 



was a nude figure 






Fernand Verhaegen carnival sketches in colour, 
influenced by Ensor's well-known burlesques. 

Whilst the exhibition at the Royal Academy was 
in progress the Ridley Arts Club also devoted a 
section to Belgian art, in 
which most of the artists 
named above were repre- 
sented, but generally with 
less important works. ( )ne 
of the principal exhibits 

by 
Maurice Wagemans ; and 
mention should also be 

made of some vigorous, 
very broadly painted sket- 
ches by John Michaux, an 

Antwerp marinist, and 
studies by Dolf van Roy, 

F. Smeers, Ed. J. Claes. 
The exhibition of the 

Women's International 

Art Club also contained 

some Belgian works : land- 
scape studies by Jenny 

Montigny, a pupil of Emile 

Claus, still-lifes by Alice 

Ronner, etchings by Mine. 

Danse - Destree, ecc. A 

most interesting feature of 

this exhibition was an 

extensive loan collection of 

ancient and modern lace, 

including remarkable 

specimens of English, 

Italian, French and Bel- 
gian work. 

We conclude the present 
review by mentioning 
an individual exhibition 



encountered elsewhere, such as James Ensor, Leon 
Frederic, Eugene Laermans, Th. van Rysselberghe, 
and others ; but space does not permit of a fuller 
notice of these on the present occasion. 




" MARIE LOUISE 



JJ 



BY EMILE VLOORS 

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Oil Painting in Japan 




HE MODERN DEVELOPMENT 



perimented,and by persistent efforts he soon gained 
a considerable facility in the use of the medium. 



OF OIL PAINTING IN JAPAN. Qf ^ ^ ^ ^ 

BY PROF. JIRO HARADA. 



Though painting in oil after the Western style was 
practised in Japan as long ago as the seventeenth 
century by Yamada Uyemonsaku, one of the leaders 
of the Amakusa rebellion of 1637, and again in the 
following century by Shiba Kokan, a more popularly 
known artist who was born in 1747 and died in 
181 8, the real history of oil painting in Japan may be 
said to begin with Kawakami Togai, who died thirty- 
three years ago at the age of fifty-four. He was 
originally an artist in the Nanga style, though when 
young he acquired considerable skill in the 
style of the Kano school, having studied under 
Onishi Chinnen ; but just before the Restoration 
in 1868, while engaged in teaching European paint- 
ing from books at the Bansho Shirabe-dokoro, a 
Government institution for imparting knowledge in 
things European, he happened to visit a Dutch ship 
at Nagasaki and fell in with a Dutch artist, from 
whom it appears he took his first practical lessons in 
oil painting. When he returned to Tokyo, he took 
back with him some oil colours, with which he ex- 



mentioned Koyama Shotaroand Matsuoko Hisashi, 
both of whom are members of the Mombusho 
(Department of Education) Art Committee and 
have contributed much toward the development 
of oil painting in Japan. 

But no less famed was another pupil of Togai 
named Takahashi Yuichi. Takahashi later took 
lessons from Charles Wirgman, who came to Japan 
in the Ansei period (1854- 1859) as a special 
correspondent of the " Illustrated London News," 
and remained for over thirty years in Japan, where 
he died in 1 89 1 at the age of fifty-seven. Takahashi 
afterwards went to Shanghai, where he became 
acquainted with some painters in oil, and on his 
return he opened a studio for teaching oil painting. 
He became very famous, and it was then that Kawa- 
bata Gyokusho, who died a few years ago, and Araki 
Kwampo, who is skilled in painting kacho subjects 
(flowers and birds) in the Japanese style, became 
Takahashi's monjin, though both subsequently 
returned to the traditional method, in which tin 
became very prominent. After the death of Yuichi, 




1 - 



FESTIVAL OF KAMO SHRINE " 
270 





BY KANOKOGI TAKESHI RO 







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PINE TREES AT MAIKO 



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the studio was conducted by his son Genkichi. 
Wirgman also had two promising young pupils 
named Goseda Hosho and Yamamoto Hosui. 
The former was considered a genius, and was sent 
abroad to study, but the results fell far short of the 
expectations of his younger days. 



Marked progress was made in the new art when 
Kunizawa Shinkuro returned in 1875 a ^ ter two 
years' study of painting in England. He welcomed 
pupils to his studio at Hirakawa-cho, Tokyo, which 
he called Eigido. After his death three years 
later, Honda Kinjiro took 
his place at the studio, 
but his ability was not 
equal to that of his 
master. Kawakami Togai, 
Takahashi Yuichi and 
Kunizawa Shinkuro con- 
stitute the three stars in &&2» 
the history of European 
painting in Japan in the 
early part of the Meiji 
era, which began with the 
Restoration. 



Art School in Tokyo. 
Hither the pupils of the 
three Japanese artists just 
named rushed with a zeal 
that inspired the Italian 
master with no small degree 
of fervour in his endeavour 
to turn the talents of 
Japan to oil painting. His 
ardour, however, was short- 
lived. To his great dis- 
appointment, and no les 
so to that of his pupils, the 
Government was not able 
to carry out its original 
plan to provide better 

facilities for art education, 

for the civil war of 187 
necessitated the curtail- 
ment of the school expen- 

by kanokogi takeshiro diture. He resigned hi 

post and returned to Itah 
It was, indeed, a blow much lamented in later 
years. Brief as was his stay in Japan, for it lasted 
not much over two years, the earnestness with 
which he taught and the zealous enthusiasm with 
which his instruction was received left a very dee}.) 
impression on the art of Japan. His influence 
was furthered by certain of his monjm, such as 



Koyama Shotaro, who was formerly a pupil of 
Kawakami Togai, Asai Chu, who died a few years 
ago, Matsuoka Hisashi, Nakamura Seijuro and 
Ando Chutaro, who died not long ago. 



A bright 
dawned 



&"c prospect 
when Antonio 
Fontanesi, a painter of 
recognised ability and 
standing in Italy, who 
painted after the manner 
of Corot, was officially 
appointed to teach at the 

2 72 





Oil Painting in Japan 




"SPRING IN THE NORTH COUNTRY 



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t ( 



MORNING IN EARLY AUTUMN" 



BY YOSHIDA HIROSHI 



After the departure of Fontanesi, another Italian 
artist named Ferritti, who happened to be in Japan, 
was employed to fill the vacancy. Ferritti was by 
no means the equal of Fontanesi, and the inferiority 
of Ferretti's art was at once recognised by the 
pupils, who rose against him. He was succeeded 
in 1 88 1 by another Italian of the name of San 
Giovanni, who taught for three years ; but he too 
failed to obtain the same hold upon our pupils as 
did the first Italian master. So untiring and 
earnest, however, were Fontanesi's disciples in the 
art of their adoption, that 

many artists in the 

Japanese style felt their 

influence and discarding 

the traditional method 

began to practise oil paint- 
A number of young 

artists, who did not come 

under the direct influence 

of the Italian master went 

abroad to pursue their 

Indies. Among them 

may be mentioned Harada 

Naojiro, Kawamura Kiyoo, 

Goseda Hosho and 

V a mam o to Hosui. So 

great was the rush for 

the new style of art that 

certain persons of in- 
fluence, such as Baron 

Kuki, thought they saw 

an imminent danger 



threatening the national 
art and began proclaiming 
the urgent necessity of 
preserving the national 
characteristics in the fine 
arts. This opposition 
proved well-nigh fatal to 
the adopted medium, 
which was as yet far from 
being firmly established, 
the art world in general 
being very much in a shift- 
ing condition. Alarmed at 
the warning cry, Kawabata 
Gyokusho, Araki Kwampo 
and a few others flung 
down their palettes and 
forsaking canvas resorted 
once more to silk and the 
traditional style of their 
fathers. 
Then the period known as the " Dark Age" in 
the modern history of oil painting in Japan set in, 
and was not soon to terminate. Kawamura K i yoo, 
who studied at Venice, and Harada Naojiro, who 
returned after a course of hard study in Germany, 
were received with cold indifference. So hope- 
lessly depressed, and so pessimistic some of the 
oil painters grew, and so indignant were they at 
the stubborn partiality of those who were in a 
position to encourage art, that one of them, a 
young oil painter, committed harakiri at his 



BY SOMA KIICIII 



lllg. 







'•SEASHORE IN SNOW 



5J 



BY KOBAYASHI SHOKICHI 

273 



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Oil Painting in Japan 





































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lc, ring in Kanda, Tokyo. However, thanks to 

tl. persistent and persevering efforts of Koyama 

otaro, Asai Chu, Matsuoka Hisashi, Vamamoto 

Hosui, Harada Naojiro, and Kawamura Kiyoo, 

tl pulse of the new movement was kept beating 

throughout this difficult period until by a change 

f ciri imstanc - brought about mainly by the 



promoters. From the Tokyo School of Fine Arts 
Kuroda Seiki and Kume Keitaro sent out such 
artists of talent as Okada Saburosuke, Wada 
Eisaku, and Nakazawa Hiromitsu. A large 
number of the Art School graduates were sent 
abroad by the Government for further stud\. 
Some of the members of the Taiheiyoga-kai, not 



adoption of tl. Western style of architecture, the to be behindhand, also went abroad by themselves 



th opened and European art 

came to b irded in a more favourable light. 

It v. in i that the first association of 

paintei in the European style was founded in 
Japan under tl name of Meiji Bijutsu-kai (the 
Fine Art ty of Meiji). About six years 

later, when Kun i Seiki and Kume Keitaro 
r Limed from I- and became professors in 

the T<«k i : ; ol Fine Arts, they organised 
the Hakuba-ka White Horse Society) in opposi- 
tion to the Meiji Bijutsu-kai. Very soon the 
Meiji Bijutsu kai v disbanded, for some of its in- 
fluential members broke away from i t and organised 

the I aih < ga kai, which held its own against the 

Hakuba-kai. The I a-kai si >d as non- 

ovemmental as op] d to the Hakuba-kai which 

had the reputation of being bureau, ratic, owing 
mainly to thi >ffi< ction maintained by its 



to acquire further practice in the art of oil painting. 
In 1899 Voshida Hiroshi, Kanokogi Takeshiro, 
Mitsutani Kunishiro, and Nakagawa Hachiro left 
Japan for France, where they remained for a few- 
years, much to the improvement of their art. 

The Hakuba-kai ceased to exist some four 
years ago, and soon afterwards the Kofu-kai was 
organised by Yamamoto Morinosuke, Nakazawa 
Hiromitsu, Kobayashi Shokichi, and others. I 
was strongly insisted upon at the time of it 
organisation that the Kofu-kai was formed inde- 
pendently of the Hakuba-kai, but it was generally 
looked upon as its rebirth under a new name. 
There was some reason for so regarding it, for its 
promoters were for the most part Mr. Kuroda's 
monjin. However, one thing is to be observed : 
the new society is free from the bureaucratic air of 
its predecessor. It is natural that it should be so, 








1111 s IN HK "AW ' (TBMPBRA) 

1 1 1 



BY ISM II MAKUTKI 












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LANDSCAPE 



BY XAKAGAWA HACHIRO 



Oil Painting in Japan 

kind to be seen in Japan 
but the verdict of the critics 
on the exhibition was far 

from being unanimous. 
The society's membership 

finally dwindled to seven- 
teen ; their second exhi- 
bition was held in the 
spring of 1913, and shortly 
afterwards the society was 
disbanded. 

Though the "Societedu 
Fusain" had such a brief 
existence the movement it 
inaugurated still goes on 
and is exercising con- 
siderable influence. The 
class of work associated 
with it has already found 
admission to recent ex- 
hibitions of the Kofu- 

for the Annual Art Exhibition of the Mombusho kai and Taiheiyoga-kai, and is coming to be 

(Department of Education) was organised in 190S looked upon much more seriously. 

with a definite governmental cachet, and 

it has a section for the European style 

f* 1 
painting. The hanging committee 

for this section were chosen from among 

the promoters of the Hakuba-kai and 

the Taiheiyoga-kai, both of which were 

then thriving societies. The works of 

such artists as Kosugi Misei, Minami 

Kunzo, Ishii Hakutei, Ishikawa Toraji, 

Tsuji Nagatoshi, and Fujishima Takeji, 

all of Tokyo ; Teramatsu Kunitaro and 

Kawai Shinzo, of Kyoto ; and Kato Seiji, 

of Nagoya, have been highly awarded at 
recent Mombusho Art Exhibitions. 

However, there were some, as is 
always the case, who found fault with 
the Mombusho Art Committee. They 
accused it of being too narrow and 
conservative for the unhindered progress 
of the European style of painting. °Ac- 
cordingly, some twenty-seven ambitious 
artists, including Kimura Sohachi, Saito 
Vori, Kishida Ryusei, Sanada Hisakichi, 
and Matsumura Tatsumi, organised the 

"Societe du Fusain/' which held its first 
exhibition at the close of 191 2 in the 
Yomiuri Shimbun Building in Tokyo 
The paintings there exhibited were post- 
impressionistic in style, and created 
some stir in the art world of Japan inas- 
much as they were the first things of the 




-76 



/ 



BEFORE THE SHOWER - ' 



BY XAKAGAWA HACHIRO 



Oil Painting in Japan 



it, and it is still the centre 
of influence in Kyoto and 
Osaka. 

Oil painting has, with- 
out doubt, gained con- 
siderable popularity of 
late. There are a large 
number of studios filled 
with students and the 
number of applicants in 
the department of Euro- 
pean painting at the 
Tokyo School of Fine 
Arts has, during the last 
few years, been far in 
excess of the available 
accommodation, while the 

BY KATO SEI1I . L c t 

department of Japanese 

painting has had difficulty 

The most important exhibition of -oil painting, in finding enough students. This fact alone is 

other than those held in Tokyo by the societies quite sufficient to show how popular the European 

above mentioned, is that of the Kwansai Bijutsu- style of painting has lately become in Japan. 




"NET DRYING, MORNING 



» 



kai held in Kyoto. This society has nearly two 
hundred and fifty members, about one-half of 
whom are also members of the Kwansai Bijutsu-in, 
the only important art institution outside of Tokyo 
for the study of oil painting. The Kwansai 
Bijutsu-in is an outgrowth of private ateliers. 

Upon his return from abroad, Asai Chu, a pupil of 
Fontanesi, opened an atelier in Kyoto for his monjin 
and christened it the Yoga Kenkujo. Four years 



However short the work of our oil painters may 
fall of the standard we insist on, it cannot be denied 
that those Japanese artists who have adopted the 
European method of expression have done much 
for the advancement of art in general. If in nought 
else, at least by their boldness and freedom of 
expression they have pointed out new possibilities 
and given a fresh stimulus to those of our artists 
who have shown more or less inclination towards 



later Kanokogi Takeshiro returned to Kyoto from conventionality. The approximation of artists who 



France, where he studied 
under Laurens, and began 
to make his influence felt 
among the oil painters o* 
the western capitol of 
Japan. Two years later 
these two masters com- 
bined their studios and 
organised the above-men- 
tioned Kwansai Bijutsu-in 
with Dr. Nakazawa, who 
is now the director of the 
Kyoto College of Industrial 
Art, as the counsellor. 
When Kanokogi Takeshiro 
went abroad for the second 
time in 1907, the institute 
was left under the sole 
management of Asai Chu, 
but on the latter's death 
two years later Kanokogi 
returned to take charge of 







"TAKAHARA IN SNOW 



?? 



BY HASHIMOTO KUNISUKE 

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Studio-Talk 




« < 



LEISURE HOURS 1 



BY NAGATOCHI SHI'TA 




follow the traditional style to the spirit of the time, 
and their close conformity to the complex require- 
ments of the age, are due mainly to those whose 
effort it was to convince others with the art they have 
imported and adopted. As to the true value of 
Western influence on our art, the present generation 
is no fair judge. We must wait awhile for the final 
verdict. But inasmuch as art should reflect some- 
thing that lies deep in the mind of the people, in 
order that the history of art may be a complete 
record of the ideas and ideals that change from 
time to time, and if the changes that our traditional 
art has undergone of late is an unaffected reflection 
of the condition of our mind in this transitional 
period of our national life, is it not a natural course 
of things, whether in itself desirable or no ? 

Viewed in this light the newly organised Kokumin 
Bijutsu Kyokai (People's Fine Art Association) 
should be an object of great interest. It aims to 
be an amalgamation of all the artists throughout 
the Empire, regardless of the style and the branches 
of art they follow. Though it is far from being 
firmly established, it has gathered within its fold 
the painters who practise the Western style 
sculptors, literary men, and architects, as well as 
painters in the Japanese style. Baron Iwamura 
professor of the Tokyo School of Fine Arts has 

been very energetic in the organisation of this 
278 




association. It held its first exhibition at Osaka in 
the fall of 191^, and the second one at U>- no last 
October. One important project the association 
is now carrying forward is the establishment 01 
National Fine Art Museum. It should be n 1- 

tioned that the association is the outgrowth of a 

small society originally intended for the yogaka 
(painters in the Western style) whose works 
have been accepted by the Mombusho Art Exhi- 
bition, and the fact that the whole movement .wa 
started and furth( d by our painters in oil show 
what an active part thi are taking in the mov< 
ment for the advancement of art in Japan. 



STUDIO-TALK. 

(From Our Own Correspondents.) 

C DON.— The death of Mr. Walter Crane, 
who passed away suddenly at Horsham 
on March 14 in his seventieth year, ha 
removed from our midst an artist of di 
tinguished and versatile attainments and one whoi 
influence on the progn of the dccorativ< arts he 
been far reaching. More perhaps than any other 
individual of his generation he strove by precept 
and example to enhance the prestig* of these art> 
and to bring about that intimate association of art 
and handicraft advocated by Rusk in and Williai 

Morris, whose politico-economic views be strenu- 
ously championed. As an artist Mr. (rain 
fame rests principally with his book illustration 
but as a painter also his rec< I. beginning some 
years before he was out of his teens, wh< n he first 
exhibited at the Royal Academy, includes many 
notable achievements ; and again as a designer, 
more especially of textiles, he was marl lly 
successful. Apart from his work as an artist, th 
chief event of his fertile career was the founding ( 
the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in ij ], 
and as the President of this body he took a 
energetic part in organising its periodical exhibi 
tions in this country and those held on several 
occasions abroad, the last being that which th 
Society held under the auspices of the French 
Government at the Louvre in Paris last summer 
just before the outbreak of war. Twelve years ago, 

in recognition of his share in organising tl British 

section of the International Exhibition of Decora 

tive Art at Turin in 1902, Mr. Crane was made a 
Commendatore of the Order of the Royal Crown 
of Italy. The deceased artist was a member of 

the Royal Society of Painters in Water- Colours, 

which he joined in 188S. That society has thus 
lost two members since the beginning of the year 





















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Studio-Talk 

_ t he "ther being tl ran Karl Haag, who the exhibition is more happy than Mr. Arthur 

lied in Germany 1 rly in January at the age of 94 Rackham's Bigbury Bay, South Devon, a pure 

m .r been connected with the society for more water-colour uncompromised by the black ink lines 

that the artist sometimes employs in his water- 
colours, to their detriment as such. 



than sixty years 



The Summer exhibition of the Royal Society of 

inters in Water( olours has proved one of the 

,, the society's exhibitions in the interest of 

t he work shown. It is Mr. Sar 3 habit to 

r , er ve some of his best work in water-colour for 

the society's summer shows, and his two pieces on 
this occasion, Boats on the f.nke of Garda and In 
Tyrol) are both rare 1 imples of his art. Mr. 
Lao Birch is responsible for some very notabl 

landscapes tins 1 n, and the flower-painter, Mr. 

Francis James, shows no falling off in his delicate 
kill. Mr. A. S. Ilartrick as usual is individual 
nd brilliant in his technique. The president, Mr. 

Alfred Parsons, R.A., is 

best represented by the 
1 nquil rendering of a 
er, The Ouse at Milton 
t. Quite one of the 
most original and atti 
tive exhibits is Miss Laura 

Knight's The Ma The 

red jacket of the central 

figure of a child and the 

in shadow of a second 

child behind her are 

treated with subtlety and 

( arm. Mr. Robert W. 

Ulan's Winter— U.S.A. 

soh a very difficult 

snow-scene problem with 

commendable artistic 

assurance. The Echo, by 

Mr. Robert Anning Bell, 

is an important imagina- 
tive design, simple in its 
chief motive and made 
atmospheric in feeling by 
the impressionism of the 
painter's style. Miss A. 

M. Swan's The Quarry, 

Mr. 1). V. Cameo. n's 

Perthshire Hills, Mr. 

Byam Shaw's When there 

is Be e, M r. Harry 

Watson's Evening Light, 

Mr. Charles Sims's Love 
in Anger and The Basket 
of Flowers remain in the 
memory, but nothing in 



The 1 06th exhibition of the Royal Institute ot 
Painters in Water Colours differs hardly at all from 
the general standard the institute has long since set 
itself. The President's (Sir James Linton's) per- 
fections in an old-fashioned convention serve to 
rai pictures in the same genre as his own to 
something like his own level ; while with some few 
exceptions "impressionism" fails into unskilful 
hands. The exhibition is greatly strengthened by 
twenty-four works by Belgian artists contributed 
through M. Paul Lambotte. Among pictures in the 
English section which deserve particular mention 




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ollowing: Greenwich Park, byMr.C. R< i 

Burnett; 1 —7'//' BreakoJ Day, by Mr. Moffat 
Lindni : 7%« '/' *— Sf. Fa fiA'a Ay, by 
Sir jani' Linton ; ./ Daughter oj hums, by Miss 

P \\\ Hawk / / ' ;;/ r/ A'. n Tan± r ier — 

j . by Mr. Ldw 1 Walker: Playmates, by 

Mr. Wynne Ap| ■ •' /''' '" the Sun, by Mr. 

Pavid T. K' Tfu Sands of M \r, by Mr. and whin d side of life, his art nevertheless 

jj, rt Coutta ; I Sout ' thi K —Jardin shows a keen eye for truth as well as a sense of 
Fontait \ by Mr. W. B. I.. B n; decoratn realism, and when he essays portraiture 

hi hrewd observation of character produces work 



"Comedie Ilumaine," and the Artistes Humour- 
istes, of which last he is a member. Having 
studied in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts for 
I years, Mr. Snow-Gil 5 was fortunate to win 
a fellowship entitling him to pursue his studies in 
three different Art Schools of the gay city. Though 
his outlook has attracted him toward the comical 



;K 1 /v Water-pot, b Mr. John Has 11. 
The spring chibition of t; R al iSociety of 

h Arti tne °tl 

the t of a war in d< ng 

But <h 



having a delightful fascination. 



Leopold Pilichowski, who has been described as 
the painter-laureate of the world of Judaism, has been 






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output 

for remark, td the followii entitled 

nee by nann . for tl »n of n it 

R r ( • b) 

Mr. H l Cliff In the 

j the Tree, 1 

Hel i McNicol; Th 

-, by Mr. W. A. 

Wildman ; Aband i, b 
I). Mun Smith 

1 Dorothea Sharp 

.1 Mr. \\ 1 

/• Old II 

tnster, by Mr. A. < 

ruthers I >uld ; Out 

A tparts, Br\ , by Mr. 

>hn Muirh ■:. and B 

Uhing, by Mr. Charl< 

\V. Simpson. Mr. 1 ink 

rangwyn, th President, 
not represented in the 

hibition. 



many nv sojourning in London during the past few months. 



By birth a Russian Pole, he spent his early years 
in that tragic city of Lodz, the mercantile and 



1 mdon has perhap 

irdly awakened v I to th 

number ol artists who in 

I >e turbulent times hav 

rifted into her midst 
Amoi >t the ne? >mei 
Mr. R. Snow Gibbs, on 

f the \"im r American 

roup from the Mont 

Pamas quarter of Paris. 

His work, of which we 

reprodu some typical 

imples, has 1 i much 

appreciated in tht annual 

alons of the Societe 

des Artistes Francais, the 




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DI * WIN G IN COLOURED CHALKS BY R. SNOW-GIB, 

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industrial metropolis of Poland, for which the hosts 
of Russia and Germany have striven so terribly. 
He was brought up in those devout circles of 
Polish Judaism which have preserved their form 
and essence more purely in Russia than anywhere 
else. For the last twenty years, however, he has 
made his home in Paris, and many exhibitions of 
his work have been given there as well as in other 
continental cities. Driven to London after the 
destruction by the French military authorities of 
his villa on the outskirts of Paris, he is now prepar- 
ing an exhibition of some of his most characteristic 
canvases for the English public. A pupil of 
Benjamin Constant, he confined himself at first to 
portraits, and so successful was he in this direction 
that he was urged to devote himself entirely to 
portraiture, but something which would embody 
not only the soul of the individual but the soul 
of a nation and a people haunted him even then. 
Later, he returned to his native Poland, where once 
more the love of the shadowy and the nocturnal 
awoke in him ; but by degrees he shook off the 
haunting of the native soil and yielded to the 
deeper instincts of the native soul, the cry of his 



race, the pageant of his co-religionists as it unfold, 
itself tragically before his eyes, and to this resolve 
the world owes the numerous epic paintings which 

have flowed from the brush of this Russia 
Polish master. He has drawn many powerful 

motives from the ghettos of the Continent, and 

since his arrival in London he has been clo |y 

studying the milieu of ^ bitechapel. Hel already 

contributed a number of portraits of famous J, ••.. 

to the Jewish Museum at Jerusalem, and it is h 
ambition to add to this steadily by painting tl 
mous Jews of < ry land for this collection. 



The three etchings by Mr. i mcis Osier, 
A.R.I.B.A., here reproduced, are noteworthy b 
reason of the evid< :e they afford of a genuir 
appreciation of the possibilities and character of 
the copper-plate and of a sympathetic under- 
standing of the true quality of the etched Line 

the more so because these plates are practically 
the artist's initial efforts in the medium. There 
is no trace of that somewhat mechanical rigidit 
of draughtsmanship which occasionally betrays 
itself in the etchings of an architect, but, rather 









THE WEARY ONE" 
282 



BY II OLD PILICHOWSK1 







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•■THE READER." BY L. PILICHOWSKI 



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THE BOBBIN SHOP." FROM AN ETCH 
ING BY FRANCIS OSLER, A.R.I.B.A 































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CK." 



••OLD SHIPBUILDING YARD, CHISWI 
AN ETCHING BY FRANCIS OSLER, A.R.I.B.A. 



FROM 



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"THE timber-yard;' etching 

BY FRANCIS OSLER, A.R.I.B.A. 



Studio- Talk 



is there a nervous vitality in the handling of the 
needle which has enabled the artist to extract an 
interest and beauty from, in two cases at any rate, 
unpromising and rather prosaic subjects. These 
three plates, together with another one or two, 
including a delightful study of an Oriel Window 
at Cerne Abbas, comprise at present the artist's 
entire ceuvre as an etcher, but as he has already 
shown even in these earliest efforts an ability to 
manipulate the etching needle with expressive effect 
his further development should be interesting. 

The National Portrait Society's rourth annual 
exhibition, recently held at the Grosvenor Gallery, 
has been an outstanding one from the inclusion of 
the President, Mr. Augus- 
tus John's portrait, Miss 
Jris Tree, and Mr. Am- 
brose McEvoy's large 
painting Madame. Both 
of these works have at- 
tracted much comment in 
the critical press, the 
former by its learned sim- 
plification and originality 
of design, the latter by a 
haunting literary sugges- 
tiveness which almost 
places it outside the cate- 
gory of portraiture proper, 
and the subtleties of 
shadow and reflection of 
a figure artificially lighted. 
Mr. Philip Connard is 
another artist who by his 
William Cleverly Alex- 
ander Esq. and Portrait oj 
a Child has advanced his 
reputation. Mr. W. Strang 
contributed The Mirror 



Sickert, Mr. W. B. E. Ranken, Mr. G. F. Kelly, 
Mr. Howard Somerville, Mr. P. A. de Laszlo and 
Miss Flora Lion should be mentioned. 

UBLIN.— The eighty-sixth Exhibition 
of the Royal Hibernian Academy of 
Arts now open in Dublin, the proceeds 
of which will be given to the Belgian 
Relief Fund, is chiefly noteworthy for the many 
interesting works shown by local artists. The 
younger painters, especially, are well to the fore, 
and the stimulating effect of Mr. William Orpen's 
influence as professor of painting at the Dublin 
Metropolitan School of Art is evident in their 
work. There is, indeed, a wave of keen enthusiasm 







re- 



and The Red Fe 
painted works calling for 
comment in their new 
aspect. The exhibition 
was enriched by the art 
of three interesting Bel- 
gians, J. Ensor, Van 
Rysselberghe, and the 
sculptor Victor Rousseau. 
Among other exhibitors 
with whom the strength 
of the exhibition generally 
rested, Mr. John Lavery, 
A.R.A., Mr. Walter 










PORTRAIT OF 



«( 



GEORGE BIRMINGHAM » (CANON J. 
DERMOD O'BRIEN, P.R.H.A. 

(Royal Hibernian Academy) 



O. II AN NAY). BY 



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"the brothers." 



BY OLIVER SHEPPARD, R.H.A. 

(Royal Hibernian Academy) 



for painting at present passing over Dublin, and 
more than one of the younger painters bids fair to 
be a" 



coming man. 



The members and associates of the Academy 
are all well represented at this exhibition. Mr. 
Nathaniel Hone, Ireland's greatest landscape 
painter, has sent eight works — none of them, we 
fancy, painted very recently. The subjects are 
those familiar to all who know Mr. Hone's work — 
cattle in a lush meadow, waves beating upon 
rocks beneath a stormy sky, peaceful river scenes. 
Mr. Dermod O'Brien, the President, is represented 
by one portrait only— that of the Rev. Canon 
Hannay, better known as "George Birmingham" 
—a scholarly work in which the humour of the 
sitter is admirably portrayed. Mr. Leech, one of 
the younger Academicians and the latest member of 
the National Portrait Society, has sent his beauti- 
ful portrait of a lady in rose and grey which was 
288 



shown at last year's Royal Academy, as well as 
several landscapes in which his sense of finely 
modulated tonal harmonies is expressed with a 
delicate precision. 



Mr. William Open's presentation portrait of 
Sir William Colliding is, as might be expected, an 
admirable portrait de ahrmom'e, brilliantly painted 
with an unwavering brush. Mr. Gerald Kelly, who 
confines himself to portraits of Burmese men and 
women, shows a very personal feeling for the 
beauty of line. Miss Purser is represented by 
four portraits, all vividly painted with swift insight 
and certainty of touch ; Mr. J. M. Kavanagh by 
three landscapes, of which Chapclizod is, perhaps, 
the most attractive. Miss S. C. Harrison, whose 
work is distinguished by its sincerity and high 
technical achievement, shows four portraits, the 
most notable being that of " Father Stafford " ; 
while Mr. Lavery shows but one, an accomplished 
portrait of H.R.H. Princess Patricia of Connaught. 



The work of two young men — Mr. James Sleator 
and Mr. John Keating, the latter being the 
holder of the Taylor Art Scholarship for this year, 




SELF-PORTRAIT BY JAMES S. SLEATOR 

(Royal Hibernian Academy) 















Studio-Talk 




WALNUT WRITING-TABLE AND VITRINE 

calls for special mention. Mr. Sleator exhibits 
four portraits, in all of which one recognises 
" quality" of a very unique kind. His rapidly 
executed head of a man in a red coat and his 
self-portrait are full of distinction and beauty of 
tone. Mr. Keating's Annushka, a seated portrait 
of a lady in a black dress, is a vivid piece of 
painting, and in another large canvas, Pipes and 
Porter, he exhibits a clear vision and brilliant 
incisiveness of touch which promise well for his 
future work. Amongst the other Irish painters re- 
presented are Mr. Jack Yeats, Miss Clare Marsh, 
who shows a clever portrait of a lady, Mr. W. 
Crampton Gore, Mrs. Clarke, Miss Maude Ball, 
and Mr. R. C. Orpen, whose water-colour interiors 
are full of charm. The sculpture section, a small 
one, includes three finely modelled statuettes by 

E. D. 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY EUGENIO QUARTI 

is at once a precursor and a master ; amateurs and 
critics alike are to-day unanimous in recognising his 
undeniable superiority in this field of work, and the 
crowd of imitators who have followed in his wake 
may in itself be regarded as a proof of his eminence. 
Despite this, however, I do not think that even 
in Italy, with all the commendation Quarli has 
received, his art is as yet adequately appreciated 
or understood. In the course of time, however, 
this constructor of furniture will assuredly be ranked 
with the most remarkable in the group of those 
who carry on the Lombard tradition-a tradition 
lacking neither value nor honour. 



Mr. Oliver Sheppard. 




Eugenio Quarti, who is to-day at the full tide or 
his artistic power, is a native of the province of 
Bergamo, and comes of a family in which the art of 
working in wood is hereditary. He recognised from 
the very earliest his vocation and soon found his 
. , ► mAiVr So he devoted himself from his youth to 



-» — * ■■■ ■"■ ^ • w I J ™ 

it my good fortune to be permitted to 

present to the readers of The Studio, 

plays at the present moment a role 

apart in the Italian decorative art movement. He 



antique, but following out his own ideas boldly 
and bravely, with all the fresh enthus.asm of a 
young and gifted man and that spirit of hope which 
























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Studio-Talk 



becomes almost a presentiment of success. In his 
own circle he was one of the first in point of time, 
and incontestably the first in point of merit, to 
venture along the untrodden way. His early efforts 
were attended with difficulty, for his robust in- 
dependence of character awakened traditional 
prejudices, exciting the sceptical distrust of some 
and the ill will of others. At this stage of his 
career, Vittore Grubicy, who aided him with an 
almost paternal protection, oft-times cheered on his 
young friend, and lavished upon him encourage- 
ment and advice. During this period Quarti was 
much influenced by the genius of the Japanese, 
whose inexhaustible fecundity in decoration 
charmed his soul athirst after a new beauty. 



Years passed on and this untiring seeker worked 
unceasingly in isolation and want, ignored by all, 
one may say, save his enemies. At the Paris 
Exhibition of 1900 his talent was revealed. It 
was the delegates of Japan and Great Britain who 
discovered, amid an accumulation of old-fashioned 
productions in the feeble light of a room in which 



quisite furniture ot elegant and slender delicacy, 
and hastened to bring it to the notice and to invite 
the approbation of the other members of the Jury, 
with the result that Quarti obtained the Grand 
Prix International. This was hisfirst public victory, 
and it elicited a well-merited eulogy from the 
architect Luca Beltrami, who while understanding 
the beautiful works of antiquity and cultivating 
tradition with an almost religious sentiment, can at 
the same time appreciate and enjoy modern aesthetic 
manifestations, provided they are worthy to be so 
described. 

Quarti himself had not dreamed of such a result, 
which by making him appreciated outside his own 
country at once enlarged the circle — till then 
infinitely restricted— of his admirers. He was, 
however, not content to rest on his laurels ; he 
wished to do better, to progress, to transform 
himself. Still quite young, having gained at one 
bound the premier place among Italian makers of 
furniture, and moreover disdainful of rivalry and 
competition, he abstained from taking part in 



they were all huddled together anyhow, this ex- competitions, even in that of the Exhibition ot 















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SMALL WRITING-TABLE AND COMMODE IN CITRON WOOD 
2QO 








DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY EUGENIO QUARTI 






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Studio- Talk 



Decorative Art at Turin in 1902, where he exhibited 

2£**~* For several years he remained 
sequestered in the solitude of his atelier devotmg 

himself to his ambitious ideal-the search for per- 
fection. It was only in 1906 thai, yielding to the 
advice of his friends, he again made an appearance, 
this time at the Milan Exhibition. His rare gifts 
manifested themselves now even more clearly than 
before; and here, as in Paris, he was awarded the 
Grand' Prix International. No hindrance could 
avail to turn this man of ardent will from the path 
marked out for him, and his art continued to 
develop with an astonishing fulness. 

I think I can divine one of the secrets of such a 
constancy of aim, and that is the unswerving faith 
of this silent revolutionary in the rights of modernity 

a modernity the exigencies of which make them- 
selves more felt every day. Not that Quarti 
ignores the past or despises it, but he has n 
thought of it when he designs and composes ; 



always very practical and of irreproachable execu- 
tion, are logical organisms. An inward and inherent 

necessity creates the form, of which the decorative 
masses are dis] >cd with a perfect equilibrium, 

and are developed with an almost austere sobriety. 
Nothin is superadded, nothing is superfluous 

bul the wh. 'Irs^n Hows naturally from a sing', 

onC eption— all is subordinated to a generative idea, 

like a body supported by its vert. l»i Besid 

retaining m his contours an admirable plastic 

fulness and a comfortable solidity, Quarti exer- 
cises a sensitive discrimination in questions of 
harmony of tone, of the combination of diver 

mat rials and the employment of various kinds < 

woods. These woods are fashioned in perfe< 
ai 1 wkh their intrinsic < haracters and the result 

is that ill the constructive and pictorial qualities of 
which they are susceptible are realised to the 

utmost. Then th addition of ingeniously coi 

trived incrustations (he was the first in our count* 
to adopt this device, in the use of which no one 



SSi 'JZZZZ =i «i - - .r>-^«JZr?+l?l 



foreign, are not unfamiliar to him, but without 
allowing himself to dwell too much upon them he 
has instinctively grasped their essentials. It may 
be that he owes to this transient comprehension 
the mobile facility of inventiveness 
and the vivacity of accent which 
render more certain and impart 
greater breadth to his own indi- 
vidual methods. Nevertheless 
there remains a definite originality 
which, possessing itself of essential 
principles, is incapable of enthral- 
ment by them, but improves upon 
or mayhap forgets them in the pro- 
duction of a new realisation. There 
is also in the compositions of Quarti 
no evidence of a juxtaposition of 
heterogeneous elements nor that 
medley of reminiscence and bor- 
rowed traits which makes what 
should be a synthetic creation 
merely a work of fastidious com- 
pilation. The immediate influence 
of this style or that school is 
nowhere apparent in his art. All 
is invented, even to the smallest 
details, and with an abundance 
of variety of which only one who 
has seen his entire production 
can adequately take stock. 



crystal, ornaments in chased or cast metal, and 
lastly little architectural motifs which now reveal 
themselves, now modestly shrink back in the 
total concordance, make the works of this craft 




Quarti's pieces of furniture 
294 



PORTFOLIO STAND IN WALNUT AND OAK 

DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY RUGENIO QUARTI 




BEDROOM IN GREY MAPLE AND CITRON WOOD. 



DESIGNED AND EXECUTED BY EUGENIO QUARTI 







COMMODE 



, AN» DRESSING-TABLE ID C.TRON WOOD 



DESIG 



- N „D AND EXECUTED BY EUGENIO QUARTI 

295 









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Art School Notes 



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MLL SORTS OF FLOWGRS'rt 
TO WHICH ®J EARTH ffi> S PR INC 



WIN GOODLY COLOURS-fcVW 
WiCLORFOtrSLY ARRAVGD** 



NEEDLEWORK PANEL WORKED WITHOUT PRELIMINARY DRAWING BY A STUDENT AT THE CENTRAL SCHOOL ( 

ART, BIRMINGHAM 



The rare be more and more recognised. In the art schools 01 



man a joy to people of refined taste, 
qualities he possesses are revealed better and more 
thoroughly in an entire interior or series of interiors 
than by a single piece of furniture, for besides 
being masterly ibiniste^ Quarti is a decorator of 
vast conceptions. Those who have visited the 
Kursaal of San Pellegrino can bear me out in this. 

GUSTAVE BOTTA. 



ART SCHOOL NOTES. 

IRMINGHAM.— Many readers of this 



magazine will no doubt remember some 



R 

I j interesting notes contributed some three 
^ J years ago (see 
The Studio for February 

1912, pp. 74-79) by Mr. 
R. Catterson-Smith on 
the subject of " Memory 
Drawing and Mental 
Imaging in Art Teach- 
ing," his observations 
being accompanied by 
illustrations of drawings 
made by young students 
in pursuance of the 
method of training de- 
scribed by him. These 
observations attracted 
considerable attention at 
the time among teachers 
in art schools and as a 
result the value of 
memory training and 
visualisation is coming to 
296 



Birmingham the methods inculcated and practised 

by Mr. Catterson-Smith have in the meantime 
been pursued with gratifying results not only 
at the Central School, of which he is principal, 
but also in other schools under his supervision as 
Director of Art Education for the City. At the 
exhibition of students' work on the occasion of 
the distribution of prizes early in February, thes 
results were demonstrated by numerous designs 
and drawings, some of which are shown in the 
accompanying illustrations. These are worthy of 
attention as showing the possibilities of a training 
in memorv drawing and visualisation. TIl 



memory 



drawing 








DESIGN BY BOY STUDENT AT THE CENTRAL ART SCHOOL, BIK 
RESULT OF A TRAINING IN MEMORY-DRAWING AND V : 



MINGHAM, AS THB 
SUALISATION 



Art School Notes 







aided them in the realisation of their memory ot 
the animal (a horse being familiar), and excited 
the imagination, the result being freshness and 



DESIGN BY BOY STUDENT AT PHE I I I'RAL ART 

51 HOOL, BIRMINGHAM 

modelled panels shown on this page were done by 

boys wh<» attend in the evening at the Vittoria 

Sti t School lor Jewellers and Silversmiths. They 

had had very little experience in modelling. The 

teacher gave them some information as to the 

structure of the horse on the blackboard. They 

vere then asked to shut their eyes and to visualise 

horse in any position they chose and to make a 

sketch of what they saw, still keeping their eyes 

closed, and lastly they modelled what they had 

imaged or visualised. This method ot procedure 




DESIGN BY BOY STUDENT AT THE CENTRAL ART 

SCHOOL, BIRMINGHAM 









■mm— — ^ the VITT0R1A STF EET SCHOOL FOR 

PANELS MODELLED FROM MEMORY BY BOY^S ^^^ BIRMINGHAM 



'EWELLEFS AND 



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Reviews and Notices 




RE VIEWS AND 
NOTICES. 

Chinese Pottery ana 

Porcelain. By 1\ . L. 
HOBSON. (London : Cas 

sell and Co. Ltd.) Two 

volumes. cSjs. net. — It is 

-nly within recent times 
that reliable information 
has been obtainable re- 

specting the pottery and 
porcelain of China. The 

work of M. Jacquemart, 
published in [875, was for 

some years the chief guide 
for the amateur collector 



the 



NECKLACE AND PEJs'DANT 



BY MISS A. M. ■ AMWEI.l. 



(Central School of Art, Birmingham) 



individuality, qualities which would never be lost 
if a nice balance were kept between the acquiring 
of knowledge and the habit of inventive expression. 
Three designs shown on the preceding pages were 
made by boys in their third and fourth year in the 
Central Art School. They were first imaged in the 
mind's eye and drawn with the eyes closed, the com- 
plete drawings being afterwards made with the eyes 
open. With these illustrations are produced a neck- 
lace and piece of needlework executed by students in 
the Central School. The latter was schemed as it 
proceeded, no preliminary drawing being made. 
It is urged that this method trains the student in 
the drawing peculiar to the needle, and gives the 
fancy more freedom than where a prescribed 
design is carried out. As shown by the exhibits 
generally the work of the Birmingham Art Schools 
reaches a high level, and although metal work, 
jewellery and kindred crafts naturally claim a 
large share of attention, it is gratifying to see 
other crafts cultivated with avidity and commend- 
able results. 

298 



Hut, in later days, 
researches of Dr. (i. L. 

Bushell, Captain F. 
Brinkley, Mr. Burton, and 
others have done much to 
rectify the mistakes of 
previous writers and 
materially to enlarge our 
knowledge of this fascinat 
ing subject. The transla- 
tion of various Chinese 
treatises has been of inesti 
mable aid to the studeni 
and Mr. R. L. Hobson, in 
the preparation of his im- 
portant work on "Chinese Pottery and Porcelain, 
has been fortunate in being able to avail himself of 
much direct information from Chinese sources as 
well as from the works of previous European 
writers on the subject. The sifting of the oft- 
times confusing details of the native historian or 
connoisseur and the co ordination of essential facts 
is a task of no mean order, and Mr. Hobson has 
approached his subject with much acumen, and 
accomplished a work which cannot fail to be 
appreciated by all those who may be genuinely 

Of the rough pottery 
of the Primitive Periods, of the mortuary and other 
pottery, of which examples have only lately been 
seen in the West, dating from the Han Dynasty 
(206 B.C. to a.d. 220) and the 'Lang Dynasty 
(a.d. 618-906), some account is given in the text, 
with typical illustrations. Many excellent examples 
of wares, which date from the Sung Dynasty 
(a.d. 960-1279), notable for their beautiful glazes, 
celadon, ivory white, blues, purples, lavender, and 
clair de lune % are figured in colours and " half- 



interested in this great art. 



Reviews and Notices 



tone." Reference is also made to the Temmoku 
tea bowls of this period so much admired at a 
,ter time by the tea masters of Japan. To the 
varied types of porcelains, the manufacture of 
which is now generally believed to date back to 
the Han Dynasty, the lai r portion of Mr. 
Hobson's work is devoted. He methodically 
reviews tin; characteristics of the early war , of 
the notable productions of the Ming Dynasty 
\.i>. 136 -1644), and of the later [><-riods of 
ECang Hsi, Yung Cheng, and Ch'ien Lung, of 

which numerous examples from important collec- 
tions in Europe and America are figured. The 
tuthor disclaims any pretensions to having treated 
his subject exhaustively. To do so would require 
1 to the numerous important collections 

existing in China, which up to the present time 



years of his life were spent in Paris and London, 
and many of the pictures reproduced are records 
of his observations of the social life of these places 
at the time. He was especially fond of depicting 
animated street scenes, race-meetings and subjects 
of a kindred nature, and as he appears to have taken 
pains to render faithfully the figures which largely 
enter into these compositions, the pictures have 
a value as contemporary records apart from their 
artistic interest. He also displayed a considerable 
talent in rendering atmospheric effects, and among 
the best things he did are those in which these 
effects form the chief motive — notable examples 
being two in which he depicts the approach of a 
storm and a gale on the sea-coast. The illustra- 
tions also include an interesting series of Vesuvian 
subjects painted during the early years of his 



are but little known to the Western amateur, but career when completing his studies at Naples. 



Mr. Hobson may be congratulated on the result 
of his researches. His volumes cannot fail to be 
admired and tr. sured by the numerous lovers of 
what are by far the most distinguished productions 
of the Ceramic Art which the world has ever seen. 



" The Cairn " is the name of the magazine of 
the Edinburgh College of Art, and its fourth number 
made its appearance at Easter, with a colour 
reproduction of a sketch by Mr. Brangwyn as 



Dedications and Patron Saints of English frontispiece, and numerous monochrome illus- 
trations, mostly representing work done by students, 



Churches. By Francis Bond, M.A. (Oxford 
University Press.) *]sMd. net. — Some hundreds of 
saints figure m this latest of Mr. Bond's ecclesio- 
logical works, which is made interesting by the 
liberal introduction of history and legend pertinent 
to the subject. The number of those whom one 
has never heard of before is extraordinary ; they 
are mostly early Celtic Saints with one or perhaps 
two dedications to their names. In addition to 
the lore relating to the better known saints— for as 
to a large number nothing is now known— the 
volume contains interesting matter concerning bell 
dedications, calendars, the consecration and dedi- 
cation of churches, ecclesiastical symbolism and 



supplementing an interesting budget of letterpress. 
The college has made a splendid response to the 
call to arms, and the list given in this number of 
" The Cairn " of members of the staff and students 
who have joined the colours comprises over a 
hundred names. The profits on the sale of the 
number are to be devoted to the Belgian Artists' 

Relief Fund. 



Though for obvious reasons the new issue of 
Photograms of the Year does not contain the usual 
representation of pictorial photography from the 
Continent, Mr. Mortimer has succeeded in bringing 



Z^ZSSJZZZZ o, h „ ,o, kS t ^e, ,» ^— co^, * P*-** 



by the same author, it is plentifully illustrated. 

Giuseppe de Nittis : L'Uomo e r Artista. By 
Vittorio Pica. (Milan : Alfieri and Lacroix.) In 
this substantial and well-produced volume Sgr. 

Pica renders homage to the memory of an Italian 
artist whose work until last year, when two rooms 
at the Venice International Exhibition were set 
apart for a special exhibition of his pictures, was 
but little known and appreciated in his own 
country. His career terminated in 1884 before he 
had reached his fortieth year, but the fact that 
nearly two hundred of his works— paintings chiefly, 
with a few etchings and drawings interspersed— are 
reproduced in this volume, affords evidence of his 
activity during his brief manhood. The last few 



in diversity of subject and technical procedure is 
exceedingly interesting. There are special articles 
on pictorial photography in Canada, Australia, the 
United States, Scandinavia, and Spain. This 
annual review is published at 2S. 6d. net. by Messrs. 
Hazell, Watson and Viney. 

We are requested by Mr. Arnold Thornam of 
Steindal, Christiania, to state that the piece of 
t-ipestry reproduced in the January number of this 
magazine, p. 309, and there stated to have been 
designed and executed by Ulnkka Greve, was 
desired by him, and also that the tapestry did not 
form part of the Norwegian Home Industry Asso- 
ciation's exhibition. 

299 








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Reviews and Notices 



Reviews and Notices 



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NECKLACE AND PRNDANT 

(Central School qf Art, Birmingham) 



individuality, qualities which would never be lost 
if a nice balance were kept between the acquiring 
of knowledge and the habit of inventive expression. 
Three designs shown on the preceding pages were 
made by boys in their third and fourth year in the 
Central Art School. They were first imaged in the 
mind's eye and drawn with the eyes closed, the com- 
plete drawings being afterwards made with the eyes 
open. With these illustrations are produced a neck- 
lace and piece of needlework executed by students in 
the Central School. The latter was schemed as it 
proceeded, no preliminary drawing being made. 
It is urged that this method trains the student in 
the drawing peculiar to the needle, and gives the 
fancy more freedom than where a prescribed 
design is carried out. As shown by the exhibits 
generally the work of the Birmingham Art Schools 
reaches a high level, and although metal work, 
jewellery and kindred crafts naturally claim a 
large share of attention, it is gratifying to see 
other crafts cultivated with avidity and commend- 
able results. 
298 



REVIEWS AND 
NOTICES. 

Chinese Pottery ana 

Porcelain. l»y R. L. 

1 1,., >n. (London : 1 is- 
sell and Co. I Ad.) Two 

volumes. 8 p. net. — It is 

only within recent times 
that reliable information 
has been obtainable re- 
specting the pottery and 
porcelain of China. The 

work of M. Jacquemart, 
published in 1875, was for 

some years the chief guide 

for the amateur collector. 

But, in later days, the 
researches of Dr. G. E. 

Bushell, Captain F. 
Brinkley, Mr. Burton, and 

others have done much to 
rectify tin- mistakes of 
previous writers and 
materially to enlarge our 
knowledge of this fascinat- 
ing subject. The transla- 
tion of various Chinese 
treatises has been of inesti- 
mable aid to the student, 
and Mr. R. L. Hobson, in 
the preparation of his im- 
portant work on "Chinese Tottery and Porcelain, 3 
has been fortunate in being able to avail himself of 
much direct information from Chinese sources as 
well as from the works of previous European 
writers on the subject. The sifting of the oft- 
times confusing details of the native historian or 
connoisseur and the coordination of essential facts 
is a task of no mean order, and Mr. Hobson has 
approached his subject with much acumen, and 
accomplished a work which cannot fail to be 
appreciated by all those who may be genuinely 
interested in this great art. Of the rough pottery 
of the Primitive Periods, of the mortuary and other 
pottery, of which examples have only lately been 
seen in the West, dating from the Han Dynasty 
(206 B.C. to a.d. 220) and the Tang Dynasty 
(a.d. 618-906), some account is given in the text, 
with typical illustrations. Many excellent examples 
of wares, which date from the Sung Dynasty 
(a.d. 960-1279), notable for their beautiful glazes, 
celadon, ivory white, blues, purples, lavender, and 
clair de lune s are figured in colours and " half- 



BY MISS A. M. I AM WE I 1 



tone." Reference is also made to the Temmoku 
tea bowls of this period so much admired at a 
later time by the tea masters of Japan. To the 
varied types of porcelains, the manufacture of 

which is now generally believed to date back to 

the Han Dynasty, the larger portion of Mr. 
Hobson's work is devoted. He methodically 
reviews the characteristics of the early wares, of 
the notable productions of the Ming Dynasty 
(A .p. ,368-1644), and of the later periods of 
fc'ang Hsi, Yung Cheng, and Ch'ien Lung, of 

which numerous examples from important collec- 
tion, in Europe and America are figured. The 
author disclaims any pretensions to having treated 

lus subj« 1 t exhaustively. To do so would require 
access to the numerous important collections 

existing in China, which up to the present time 
, but little known to the Western amateur, but 
Mr. Hoi m may be congratulated on the result 
f his r. Lrches. His volume, cannot fail to be 
admired and treasured by the numerous lovers of 
what are by far the most distinguished productions 
f the amic Art which the world has ever seen. 



years of his life were spent in Paris and London, 
and many of the pictures reproduced are records 
of his observations of the social life of these places 
at the time. He was especially fond of depicting 
animated street scenes, race-meetings and subjects 
of a kindred nature, and as he appears to have taken 
pains to render faithfully the figures which largely 
enter into these compositions, the pictures have 
a value as contemporary records apart from their 
artistic interest. He also displayed a considerable 
talent in rendering atmospheric effects, and among 
the best things he did are those in which these 
effects form the chief motive— notable examples 
being two in which he depicts the approach of a 
storm and a gale on the sea-coast. The illustra- 
tions also include an interesting series of Vesuvian 
subjects painted during the early years of his 
career when completing his studies at Naples. 



Dedications and Patron 

Churches. By Fran< IS 



Saints of English 
Bond, M.A. (Oxford 
University Press.) js.6d. net— Some hundreds of 
saints figure m this latest of Mr. Bond's ecclesio- 
logical works, which is made interesting by the 
liberal introduction of history and legend pertinent 
to the subject. The number of those whom one 
has never heard of before is extraordinary ; they 
lie mostly early Celtic Saints with one or perhaps 
two dedications to their names. In addition to 
the lore relating to the better known saints— for as 
to a large number nothing is now known-the 
volume contains interesting matter concerning bell 



dedications, calendars, the consecration and dedi- 
cation of churches, ecclesiastical symbolism and 
the emblems of the saints, and, like the other works 
by the same author, it is plentifully illustrated. 

Giuseppe de Nittis : L'Uomo e FArtista. By 
Vittorio Pica. (Milan : Alfieri and Lacro.x.) In 
this substantial and well-produced volume Sgr. 
Pica renders homage to the memory of an Italian 
artist whose work until last year, when two rooms 
at the Venice International Exhibition were set 
apart for a special exhibition of his pictures, was 
but little known and appreciated in his o»n 
country. His career terminated in .884 before he 
had reached lus fortieth year, but the fact that 
nearly two hundred of his works-paintings chiefly, 
with a few etchings and drawings interspersed-^ 
reproduced in this volume, affords evidence of his 
activity during his brief manhood. The last tew 



" The Cairn " is the name of the magazine of 
the Edinburgh College of Art, and its fourth number 
made its appearance at Easter, with a colour 
reproduction of a sketch by Mr. Brangwyn as 
frontispiece, and numerous monochrome illus- 
trations, mostly representing work done by students, 
supplementing an interesting budget of letterpress. 
The college has made a splendid response to the 
call to arms, and the list given in this number of 
" The Cairn " of members of the staff and students 
who have joined the colours comprises over a 
hundred names. The profits on the sale of the 
number are to be devoted to the Belgian Artists 
Relief Fund. 

Though for obvious reasons the new issue of 
Photograms of the Year does not contain the usual 
representation of pictorial photography from the 
Continent, Mr. Mortimer has succeeded in bunging 
together an international collection of prints which 
in diversity of subject and technical procedure is 
exceedingly interesting. There are special articles 
on pictorial photography in Canada, A^traita, the 
United States, Scandinavia, and Spain. This 
a,lal review is published at u. U net. by Messrs. 



Hazell, Watson and Viney. 

We are requested W^ Arnold Thornam of 
Ste ndal, Christian*, to state that the piece of 

nnestry reproduced in the January number of this 
tapestry ic F h been 

maS8Z ? P -fe^ef5 tnikka Greve, was 

deS ! g,1 1 h Jin nd also that the tapestry did not 
S^ft'No^- Home industry Asso- 

ciation's exhibition. ^ 















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7^ ZtfjV Figure 




HE LAY FIGURE: ON THE 
OFFICIAL PORTRAIT. 



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Do you think an artist is ever able to 
show the best side of his capacity when he is 
obliged to work under orders ? " asked the Young 

Painter. 

I should say most decidedly not," replied the 
Art Critic ; " and I think most artists would agree 
with me. In fact I have known more than one 
instance of men refusing commissions to paint a 
prescribed subject on the ground that they would 
not be able to do themselves justice under such 
conditions if they accepted them. But why do you 

ask ? " 

" Because it seems to me that a great many 
people do not realise how seriously they hamper 
the artist by imposing conditions upon him, or that 
they spoil the quality of his work by limiting his 
freedom of action," explained the Young Painter. 
" Look at modern portraiture especially. I cannot 
help thinking that for much of the dull and poor 
stuff one sees nowadays the client should be blamed 
rather than the painter." 

" Do you mean that a dull sitter makes a dull 
picture ? " asked the Man with the Red Tie. " The 
artist cannot very well pick and choose, and it would 
not be reasonable for him to expect every person 
who wants his likeness painted to be brilliantly 
inspiring." 

" No, it is not quite that," returned the Young 
Painter. " There are some people, of course, in 
whom the artist could never feel the slightest 
interest, and whom he never could make anything 
but commonplace. What I had in my mind was 
the persistent badness of what I should call the 
official portrait. How often do you see a painting 
of this type that can be said to be even passably 
interesting, except perhaps to the sitter and those 
who are personally acquainted with him ? " 

"Not often, I am afraid," agreed the Critic. 
" In work of that class there is a convention which 
nearly every one follows." 

"A convention! Yes! But who is responsible 
for that convention?" cried the Young Painter. 
" Not the artist, I am sure, for even the bigger men 
seem to be as much cramped by it as the struggling 
beginner. I lay the blame upon the people who 
give the commissions for these stupid, irritating 
performances." 

"You blame them for insisting that the work 

shall be done in a particular way, and that this 

way is not the one that the artist would choose ir 

he were left to himself," said the Critic. " Well, 

300 






there is a good deal in that. The official portrait 
is, as a rule, commissioned by a committee which 
represents the subscribers, and the members of this 
committee, being dressed in a little brief authority, 
are anxious to prove their importance by bullying 
some one — and that some one is usually the artist 
to whom the commission is given. 

"And how they bully him I" sighed the Man 

with the Red Tie. " How they criticise his work ! 
How they lay down the law as to what he must do 
and what lie must not do ! I know the ways of 

those committees." 

"Yes, and so do I, unfortunately," returned the 
Young Painter; "and I can tell you that they 
understand nothing but the official convention and 
that they hold it like a pistol to the artist's head. 
For their money he has to sacrifice, or at all 
events to jeopardise, if not his life, at least his 

irtistic reputation." 

" It is always open to him to rebel, however, 
and to do the work in the way he thinks right, 
suggested the Critic. 

" What is the good of that ? " asked the Young 
Painter. " I know a man who rebelled and who, 

ignoring convention and relyingon his own judgment 

painted a public personage as he saw him, and 
made a jolly good portrait of him too. What was 
the result ? The portrait was refused with absolute 
abuse, and the committee, which happened to have 
the power to commission othei portraits, passed a 
series of resolutions which will make the lives of 
all artists who do anything for it in the future an 
absolute misery — that is, if they are artists worthy 
of the name." 

" Yes, it seems pretty hopeless," admitted the 
Critic. " In art matters, as in most others, then- 
are no people who know so much as those who know 
nothing, and the committeeman's vast and monu- 
mental ignorance is like nothing else on earth. 
Perhaps, some day the ordinary member of the 
public will acquire knowledge enough to discover 
that there are other kinds of art besides the one 
which the committee recognises and insists upon 
having, and then the artist will have the chance 
he does not get now." 

" Perhaps, some day pigs may fly," scoffed the 
Man with the Red Tie ; " but I do not think we are 
likely to live to see it. The only cure of the evil 
would be for all artists to agree among themselves 
and to refuse one and all to paint portraits in the 
official manner. But when all artists agree on any 
subject we shall have reached the millennium and 
official portraits will no longer be required." 

The Lay Figure. 



The Passing Show 




RIIAl'^ >IU 



BY JONAS LIE 




HE PASSING 

SHOW 
BY 
W. H. m B. NELSON 

I. BROOKLYN EX- 
HIBITION 

The Brooklyn Enstitute 
Museum scored an unpre- 
cedented success with its 
recent invited exhibition, 

which has attracted enor- 
mous attention amongst 
art enthusiasts who have 

hitherto looked to the 

Carnegie Institute and the 
Pennsylvania Academy as 

the only media for such a 
rich display of contempo- 
rary American art. The 

long western gallery, ex- 




GIRL WITH THE 
PINK BOW 



BY MARY 
CASSATT 



cellently lighted and par- 
titioned off so as to form a 
number of diminutive gal- 
leries, offered the oppor- 
tunity for admiring groups 
of paintings, undisturbed 
bv discordant companion- 
ship. The keynote of this 
praiseworthy enterprise 
was the sanity of the col- 
lection, the outlawing of 
the ultra modern and the 
ultra antique combined 
with superb hanging. That 
it will be the precursor of 
still more important an- 
nual exhibitions goes with- 
out saying and it behooves 
New York now more than 
ever to look to its laurels, 
especially when new facili- 

cxxi 



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77/<? Passing Show 

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FISHERMEN S HOUSES, ST. IVES 



BY HAYLKY LEVER 



ties of travel will place the visitor quickly and 
directly in the very vestibule of the Institute. 



Robert Henri submitted an unknown piece 
of work, a brilliantly painted half-nude girl. 



The exhibition was most comprehensive and This and an Irish landscape, along with an In- 
included Cecilia Beaux, William Chase and Mary dian girl, formed a splendid trilogy. Twogood 
Cassatt; Albert P. Ryder, with eight 
canvases; a couple by Philadelphia's 
veteran artist, Thomas W. Eakins; a 
Weir, a Davies, a Lever and a Mani- 
gault; Bellows' Gerald hie Lee, No. i, 
and a portrait of Maxheld Parrish 
by Kenyon Cox. John W. Alexander 
showed a graceful woman leaning 
over a table; Kroll a very decora- 
tive North Spanish Town. Glackens 
and Sloan were well represented. 
A beautifully decorative still-life, 
full of splendid colour, showed a 
new side of Jonas Lie, while the 
best I 



of his Panama group, The 
Heavenly Host, reappeared as the 
Heavenly Hoist, losing nothing in 
the process. A newcomer, Montagu 
Marks, is worth following. 

CXXII 




NORTH SPANISH TOWN 



BY LEON KROIf, 











_■■_ 



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W\>HOE VALLEY, NEVADA 



BY ALBERT L. GROLL 







BY ARTHUR B. DAVIES 



ROSE TO ROSE 



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77^ Passing Show 




II. FRIENDS OF YOUNG ARTISTS 

This latest organization commenced its cam- 
paign with an exhibition of sculpture pleasantly 
shown at the Reinhardt Galleries, loaned for the 
occasion. The subject for a competition given 

and 



War," 



out by Mr. Daniel C. French was 

some hundred and thirty young artists attacked 



PORTRAIT OF MRS. WILLIAM 
N. KREMER 



BY CECILIA 
BEAUX 



landscapes by Ben Foster, a fine hillside paint- 
ing by Gardner Symons; a twilight Metcalf; 
three entertaining snapshots by Luks; a 
brilliant Frieseke in contradistinction to a 
pallid Dewing, gave opportunity to test the 
strong pulse of American painting of to-day. war 




BY A. RAMON 




SAVING THE STANDARD 



CXXIV 



BY JEANNE BERTRAND 





The Passing Show 




WAR 



BY ANTHONY DE FRANCISCI 



qualified on similar grounds. Some very excel- 
lent work appeared, showing fine modelling 
and a well-trained imagination. Much was 
Beaux Arts and much was bizarre. The jury did 
their best and showed considerable patience over 
a very difficult and somewhat thankless task. In 
the end, as usual, they did not please everybody. 
It was noticeable that about 2 per cent only of 
the exhibitors expressed the joie de battre, the rest 
evidenced the sheer misery and tragedy of blood- 

•* Cj J 

shed, the agony and despair of cities and people 
devastated by poluphlosboysterous hordes of 
murderers in armour. It is no wonder that the 
public, deeply interested though it was, felt no 
inclination to purchase. People want to outlive 
and forget war. 

The next exhibition to be held in the studios 
of Mrs. Harrv Pavne Whitnev, who has done and 
is doing so much for this cause, will take place 
June 15 and will be painting, the subject, given 
out by Mr. John Alexander, to be Labour. 

The latest enthusiast in this good cause is 
Mr. Otto H. Kahn who has done much besides 
making a donation of one thousand dollars. 



the theme with enthusiasm, omitting 
none of the horrors and misery which 
war evokes. Many of the exhibitors 
seemed so anxious to start that they 
barely paused to consider what was asked 
of them but rushed into subjects which, 
though traceable to conflict, hardly ex- 
press the spirit or essence. For instance, 
a half-caveman, half-gorilla, clothed in a 
German helmet and an upturned mous- 
tache is but an unveiled satire upon one 
of the contesting nations now at war, 
while a very wooden-looking colt looking 
over the pasture gate and labelled 
Mamma's Gone to the Front, hardly 
claims serious attention. Two or three i 
dozen numbers should have been dis- at close grips 




BY GLADYS FERRIS 



CXXV 










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The Passing Shot, 



' 




THE OLD MILL-POND 



BY G. GLENN NEWELL 



III. ALLIED ARTISTS OF AMERICA known as the Academy room; and the use of the 

Though the Conservatives and Progressives do Central Gallery for small material, sheltered by 

the large canvases in the South and Vanderhilt 
Galleries, a happy blend. 

The Allied Artists are striving for the advance- 
ment of American art, by opening new avenues of 
opportunity for the exhibition of meritorious 
works of art for which the Academy finds no space, 
this product is so far short-reaching, for the reason or else hangs so abominably that the artist would 



not employ the pristine vigour of the Guelphs and 
Ghibellines in their conflicts, still the rope of art 
receives occasional jolts from the one faction or 
the other. Sometimes a more than ordinary 
strain on the rope produces some little result, such 
as the Allied Artists of America. The effect of 



that amid the clash of cymbals heralding in the 
new men, the public fails to see any fresh tendency 



derive as much benefit if his canvas were put on a 
clothes-line in a back yard of Hoboken. All 



or anything in their exhibition which might not honour to the Allied Artists, who are at least teach- 
hang with perfect propriety upon the walls of a 



spring or winter exhibition of the Academy. What 
the public did see and admire was a beautifully 
hung exhibition in which the artists were allotted 



ing the lesson that artists must help themselves if 
they wish to benefit others. Near a hundred 
members, who have stood shoulder to shoulder for 
sixteen months, can at least be sure that their pic- 



certain wall space, for which they drew lots; the tures will be shown in the best possible manner, 
elimination of the Bluebeard chamber, officially and it is now up to them to convince the public 



cxxvi 













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77/* Passing Show 




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that they are worthy of special attention. The 
demon of mediocrity that bites so deeply into the 
vitals of Academic exhibitions, must be warned off 



IV. INDIANA ARTISTS AT THE 
JOHN HERRON INSTITUTE 

The work of the painters of Indiana is not 



the premises of the Allied Artists, or else they will very well known in the East, but the repre- 

plead in vain. I 



Among lesser known exhibitors none has blos- 
somed forth with brighter promise than Christina 
Morton, whose work, though not impeccable, has 
tine colour and that feeling of joy of production 
that bids the beholder halt and share the pleasure 
of the artist. 



c XXVII I 



sentation from that State has always been one 
of the strongest features of the exhibitions of 
the Society of Western Artists. There are many 
, who believe that the real American art of the 
future will come out of the Middle West, from 
those artists who have received their inspiration 
directly from the American country and people. 



The Passing Show 




,' 












ighlh Annual Exhi n at the John Herron Art Institute 
wis I i R NOONDAY 













RiM Annual Exhibition a! the John Herron irt Institute 



THE ARM N \L BELL 



BY OTTO STARK 



BY T. C STEELE 



To these, the present Annual Ex- 
hibition of Works by Indiana Artists 
in the John Herron Art Institute, 
Indianapolis, will be of more than 
passing interest. As always, the 
real mainstay of the Indiana ex- 
hibitions is the work of the so- 
called "Hoosier Group"— T. C. 
Steele, William Forsyth, J. Ottis 
Adams and Otto Stark. Although 
they have taken root in In- 
diana, they have not permitted 
themselves to become provincial 
but have kept in touch with the 
general movements of art in the 
world. Under their tutelage many 
young men and women have car- 
ried a love of art and a knowledge 
of its technical practice to all the 
various corners of the State; many 
have gone still farther afield and 
have either achieved reputations 

CXXIX 





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PORTRAIT OF WM. FORSYTH, ESQ. BY S. P. BAl S 



for themselves or have 
helped in promoting art in- 
terest in the Middle West. 
But it is most encourag- 
ing to notice from year to 
year in the Indiana exhi- 
bitions the growing strength 
of the younger generation, 
those who are just beginning 
to make themselves known. 
This year, more than ever 
before, one realizes that 
when the members of the 






Hoosier Group''* have 
passed on, there will be 
others to carry forward their 
ideals. S. P. Baus and Clif- 
ton A. Wheeler attracted 
attention. 

Others whose work should 
not be overlooked were J. E. 
Bundy, of Richmond; Mrs. 
J. O. Adams, Brookville; 
William Edouard Scott and 
Wayman Adams, both of 
Indianapolis. 

H. McCormick, of Leonia, 

N. J., and C. ReirTel, of Nor- 
walk, Conn., contributed a 
ringing note to the exhi- 
bition. 



cxxx 



COWBOY 



Y. PLASTIC CLUB, PHILADELPHIA, AND 
PEABODY INSTITUTE, BALTIMORE 

A Baltimore an, Marjorie D. Martinet, and a 
sprinkling of Philadelphians, including Ada C. 
Williamson, Anne W. Strawbridge, Alice Kent 
Stoddard and Elizabeth Sparhawk-Jones, have in 
their recent exhibitions demonstrated how ably a 
woman can play a man's part in painting. These 
ladies met with marked success at the Plastic Club 
Philadelphia and at the Peabody Institute, Bal- 
timore. 

Anne W. Strawbridge showed ten canvases 
which gave her indisputable right to be reckoned 
an animal painter of prominence. Many paint 
animals, few are animal painters. This lady in- 
terprets horses and endows them with individual- 
ity and character and, what is equally important, 
she gives the true action. Alice Kent Stoddard 
scored a signal success in the difficult task of treat- 




BY MARJORIE D. MARTINET 



ing childhood naturally without suggesting the 
portrait in Paper Dolls. It is a snapshot in oils 



VI. THE PORTRAIT PAINTERS 

The National Association of Portrait Painters 



and technically excellent. This artist can do held their usual annual show in New York Citv 
other things with her palette. She stands high and at the National Museum, Washington, D. C. 
among American marine painters. Elizabeth They offered no special surprises, it is true, but the 



Sparhawk-Jones is so busy with colour that she 
somewhat neglects drawing. An old gardener 
stooping over his geranium is an orgy of colour 
intelligently applied. Her other picture was less 
interesting. Ada C. Williamson showed portraits 
and etchings. Her Peacock Girl is a grand study 
of blues and greens and extremely decorative. 
Several good seashore etchings testified to her 
abilities with the needle. Good landscapes, wood 
scenes of tree trunks and valley, a quarry entitled 
Human Ants, were credited to Marjorie D. Mar- 
tinet. To lend additional interest to the exhibi- 
tion was a large group of sculptures, commemora- 
tive of the late Emily Bishop, that talented Mary- 
land artist who died so young, and some good por- 
trait busts by Beatrice Fenton. 



twenty-two exhibits totalled a high average of 
proficiency in interpretation of character. The 
finest example of simplified art was undoubtedly 
Cecilia Beaux's portrait of Mr. William Straight. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Crawford, Eugene Speicher, 
George Bellows, Irving Wiles and Robert Vonnoh 
were all well represented with vital renderings of 
their subjects, proving themselves in possession of 
that idiosyncratic note which a good painting 
must have if it shall appeal to our aesthetic emo- 
tion. A portrait of a lady in a blue, spangled gown 
by Howard Gardner Cushing was remarkable for 
its forceful background in black against buff. 
Johansen's portrait of the veteran art editor, Mr. 
Alexander W. Drake, is too well remembered from 
the Academy to need further notice. 




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BY ANNE W. STRAWBRIDGE 



CXXX I 






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of different shows held during the winter, and will 



We are accustomed to consider the Car Zf ' ^ 'ff** t™ ? C """"" m ° nthS - 

negie Institute as the official sexton of the H n \ * ** <*?* by * "* ° f COlOUred 

art season for fl ftPr ^ , °. ht hographs on stone, by Malvina Hoffman, the 

ait season, ior after their annual exhibition sculntr^ ^A ™n i~™ ™*i ~* t,.,,' _, 

nothing stirs until the winter. This season the 

sinking of the Lusitania mav be said to have taken 

thp r*i'ir#> ^f fKof fo -\: . r "* lliauc uluus anus oi stuoies oeninci the scenes, 

tne place oi that iamous institute as far n« mm u i 

.....;' *i_ - . • S COm " when she was not fortunate enough to have that 



sculptress and well-known pupil of Rodin, of 
Pavlowa and members of her company. For these 
she made thousands of studies behind the scenes. 



pleting the art season is concerned. Every one 
bemoans the loss, among other valuable lives, of 
the many well-known dealers and experts who 
went down in that ill-fated vessel. 

At the galleries of the Berlin Photographic Com- 
pany, Mr. Birnbaum has arranged a varied and 
unique exhibition. It is, in some cases, a review 






A PORTRAIT OF HIS DAUGHTER 
BY IRVING R. WILES 




DESIGN FOR A FOUNTAIN 



BY PAUL MORRIS 



gifted dancer pose for her. They are exquisite in 
drawing (note particularly the hands), some are 
violent in action, all are full of beautv and show 
immense deal of study. One queries if such detail 
of form could be seen when the figures are in whirl- 
ing motion. 

At one end of that small room which for years 
has shown the New York public such unusual and 
interesting exhibitions, are hung a set of litho- 
graphs by Albert Sterner. The centre is occupied 
by the well-known Amour Mort, one of his most 
successful drawings. Near by the marvellous por- 
trait-study of Mr. Birnbaum, Herbert Baer is rep- 
resented by studies of birds done in coloured prints 
from wooden blocks, which are the outcome of 
many studies made in the Zoological Gardens at 
the Bronx. Prominent here are colour prints of 
flowers by Edna Boies Hopkins, engraved on wood 
and printed by hand. These are exceedingly 
beautiful and indicate a great power of selection 
and a strong colour sense. 

Mrs. L. Wright, who is self-taught, is repre- 
sented by a number of groups of flowers in 
water colour. In some cases her work is naive, 
but shows how untrammelled and individual the 
secluded student and lover of nature may be. 
She shows patient study, research and a wonder- 
ful sense of colour-combinations. One sees again 
a few of Mrs. Burroughs' delightful bronze figures 
and Herbert Crowley's extraordinary morality 
studies. 

Ernest Haskell's etchings of heads and land- 
scapes complete one of the most charming displays 
shown this year. 

At the Montross Gallery was shown from April 
28 to Mav 22 the third of the series of exhibitions 
by the Modernists, a special exhibition of modern 
art applied to decoration. Mr. Montross an- 
nounces in a leaflet that "the men who made them 
have thrown their hat into the ring"; that their 
work is no mere experiment; that they are in frank 
competition with what is outworn, conventional 
and uninteresting; with the stupid allegories and 
historical scene-painting with which our public 

CXXXIII 










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buildings and private houses have been disfig- 
ured. Also "They wish to get away from the 
incongruous and trivial and stick to self-expression 
above all things." All must approach such an 
exhibition with an open mind. A few showed 
veneration, many sought earnestly "what they 
were driving at," desiring a formula, many still 
expressed ribald merriment. 



Taylor's Blue Tap-room is unmistakably blue. 
Glackens had two portraits in which he has out- 
Renoired Renoir. Prendergast's Summer is a 
decoration and is one of his joyous out-of-doors 
effects with which the art world is so familiar. 
Elmer MacRae's Poppies and Lilies are long 
panels, and show the only attempt at convention- 
alization. One enthusiastic visitor mistook 



The exhibition was a great success as containing morning glories for a hospital chart of in- 
examples of " self-expression . ' ' Arthur B . Davies' testines. 



large decoration is the only one which could prop- 
erly take its place on a wall as a decoration. It is 
called The Dawning, and shows several finely hate to be alone with it!" Maurice Sterne showed 



Kuhn had a large, lumpy lady seen in rectan- 
gles. Some one in the gallery remarked "I'd 



drawn but indistinct forms, with rectangular and 
very black back hair. Several rectangles are 
thrown into corners and the whole is enclosed in a 
narrow, bright blue frame. Davies' other con- 
tribution is a small canvas In a Forest. Four 
Botticelli figures are gracefully posing against the 
huge trunk of a redwood tree. They are lovely in 
line and colour and remind one somewhat of 
his former manner of painting. 



three examples. Though sombre in colour the 
mass of Indian figures are cleverly drawn and 
indicate great study of the people of Bali. In 
the outer room, George Hart was represented by a 
number of fine water-colours of natives of Samoa, 
Tahiti and Morea. 

Hamilton Easter Field's nine canvases, re- 
cently exhibited at the Daniel Gallerv, show exeat 

J n 

freshness and freedom of technique and an excel- 




IONE 



ex xx IV 



BY IVAN G. OLINSKY 



lent sense of colour and of 
values. The three portrait 
studies are broad, yet not 
slighted in modelling, and ex- 
hibit insight into the charac- 
ter of the sitters. Field is to 
be congratulated in his com 
paratively new choice of sub- 
ject — snow-covered roof-tops. 
In Hanging Gardens I find 
great harmony of tone, a 
charm and a poetic sense. 

Waterfall is indicated in a 
few broad strokes of strong 
colour and is but an impres- 
sion. It could have found 
congenial company in an ex- 
hibition of the same charac- 
ter half a block away. His 
still life lacked truth in values 
and a spontaneity found in his other works. He 
belongs to the sane members of the modern school, 




Exhibited at National Academy of Design, 1015 
PORTRAIT OF MISS IVES 



BY I. E. HORI 



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Isidor Portrait Prize at the Salmagundi Cluh, iqis 



PORTRAIT OF MILDRED 



BY ARTHUR FREEDLANDER 



is individual in his viewpoint and should not abuse 
(as in Waterfall) his delicate sense of colour. 

Dunns; the month of Mav an Ex- 
hibition of Original Sculpture by 
American Women was held at the 
Gorham Galleries. The exhibits were 
not ambitious in character, being 
small in size, and tending to the imagi- 
native rather than to the realistic. 
Of the few life-sized portrait busts 
shown, Gail Sherman Corbett's, loaned 
by Miss Cottle, was the most im- 
portant. Gertrude V. Whitney showed 
an excellent study of a head in mar- 
ble; Janet Scudder was represented 
by a bronze Girl with Fish, being one 
of her Fountain series. Although the 
figure has great distinction, it lacks 
the grace and movement of her other 
works of that character. Edith W. 
Burroughs' Water Baby is also a foun- 
tain and, although not an original 
idea, is a beautifully modelled figure 
of a child. Fountains are the favorite 
designs, and Laura Gardin Frazer ex- 
hibited the most successful of all. This 
was a table fountain, unusual both in 
conception and in execution. The 
figure of the bashful little child is 
charming, naive and original in char- 
acter, while the decorative bas-relief 
on the pedestals is well modelled. 

CXXXY 



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/;/ ///£ Galleries 

Among the few designs of animals or of birds beautifully installed. Its large gallery contains 
were Helen Morton's sketch of Mare and Foal, seventy-five works, every one the creation of a 
and Elizabeth Norton's Lioness and Cubs. 

Stina Gustafson's Celtic Memorial Cross is im- 
pressive; Harriett W. F rish muth ' s Girl with Dol- 
phin (portion of a double fountain) was among the 
most successful of the large ambitious subjects. 
Caroline Peddle Ball's Bird Bath should be ac- 
quired by bird lovers and placed in their gardens. 
The influence of the war was shown in Bonnie 
Kramer's Hate, and very strikingly in Sally James 
Fainham's The Little Silver Rosary that Keeps a 
Man from Harm. But, according to the interpre- 
tation of the sculptress, the rosary does not seem 
to be effective. 

Anna Vaughan Hyatt's dancing figure, with 
garlands and doves, has great beauty and grace, 
reminding one of the dancer who has recently 
charmed many at the Century Theatre. It is one 
of few original conceptions for a fountain figure. 

Malvina Hoffman's Pavlowa Gavotte, loaned by 



native Argentine None of these have been shown 
before at any exposition. In speaking of the 
Argentina section, J. E. D. Trask, chief of the 
Department of Fine Arts, who was himself United 
States Commissioner-General to the International 
Exposition held at Buenos Aires in 1910, said: "I 
am delighted that our friends from the great 
Republic of the South have made in this depart- 
ment an exhibit in every way worthy of the high 
artistic standards of their nation. Perhaps no 
people in the world have a more moving recogni- 
tion of the importance of style, and this is well 
shown in their installation here. Both in painting 
and in sculpture, the Argentine Republic ranks 
high among nations of the world, while in architec- 
ture they hold a foremost position. Their present 
exhibit, entirely the work of native Argentinos, 
will, I hope, do much to inspire among our own 
people a desire to know more of them. The most 



Mile. Pavlowa, would without question carry off important service which the Exposition can do 
the gold medal of the exhibition should one be for their country is to arouse an appetite for 
given. A small gilded figure in wax, it is a won- 
derfullv truthful delineation of that talented dan- 

J 

seuse. In poke-bonnet and early Empire gown, 
she is represented in one of her incomparable 
attitudes in that most fascinating of dances. 
It is Pavlowa to the life, as well as an exquisitely 
beautiful figure. One should attend the exhibi- 
tion if only to see this. The catalogue, whose 
front page is a bright yellow and which is tied with "I have read in the March issue of The 

yellow and purple ribbon, is very suggestive of a International Studio an inspiring article on 

' Truth and Personality in Art,' written by Ray- 



knowledge relating to other lands, and the Argen- 
tine section in the Fine Arts Palace, beautiful as it 
is, will itself serve the double purpose of satisfying 
our sense of the beautiful and stimulating our 
desire for knowledge." 




ROM A CORRESPONDENT 



well-known movement among women to-day. 
What it indicates, in the case of American women 
sculptors, one can easily conjecture. 

The Ehrich Galleries showed during May a 
marvellous assemblage of Byzantine paintings, 
carvings, manuscripts, embroideries, etc., from the 
collection of Halvor Bagge. The brothers Ehrich 
afforded to all visitors a verv rare treat in this 
unique display. 




RGENTINA SECTION, PANAMA 
PACIFIC EXPOSITION 



Senor Horacio Anasagasti, Argentine Com- 
missioner-General to the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition, has recently opened the 



mond Wyer, and feel that the clear insight 
therein expressed of the true verities of art con- 
jointly with life will be of inestimable value to me, 
in strongly impressing those vital essentials on my 
mind. Though I have felt in my nature and tried 
to realize in some degree these truths through ex- 
pression in my work, I had but faintly grasped the 
understanding of the importance of the expres- 
sion — "contemporary spirit of our times." I feel 
it, to my own benefit, to be the most enlightening 
article on the essentials of art I have ever read, 
and most particularly so in the understanding I 
have gained of the relationship of what is vital in 
art to-day with the art of all time— that really 
lives. This article will help me powerfully to 



Argentine section in the Palace of Fine Arts. In weld my desires to efforts toward their realization, 
keeping with all of the exhibits made by the I am thinking, too, what a great breadth of 
Argentine Government, its fine arts exhibit is it will open to many minds." 



vision 



cxxxvi 



June, IQ15 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



13 



A Plea for Universal Peace 

WAR AND WORLD GOVERNMENT 

By Dr. Frank Crane, author of "Footnotes to Life," etc. 
Cloth. $1.00 net. 

This new volume includes Dr. Crane's editorials upon 
the subject of war. At first only a protest against the 
immense stupidity of war, its cruelty and causelessness, his 
articles gradually take on a more positive tone, becoming 
an ardent plea for world government. 

NEW ART BOOKS 

WHAT PICTURES TO SEE IN AMERICA 

By Mrs. L. M. Bryant, author of "What Pictures to See 
in Europe," etc. Over 200 illustrations. 8vo. Cloth. 
$2.00 net. 

In order to see art museums rightly in the short time at 
the disposal of the general tourist, a careful guide must be 
had to save time and strength. Mrs. Bryant in the present 
book visits the various galleries of America from Boston to 
San Francisco and points out the masterpieces of famous 
artists. 

■ 

GOOD TASTE IN HOME FURNISHING 

By Henry B. Sell and Maud Ann Sell. With a colored 
frontispiece and numerous line drawings. Cloth. 12mo. 
$1.00 net 

A book on interior decoration written for the lay reader. 
Every phase of the subject is carefully considered. In an 
intimate, easy style, free from technical terms, the author 
brings out clearly the simple, decorative principles that 
make the home comfortable, cheerful and beautiful. We 
feel, therefore, that this book will fill a real need. 







Statement for April 1, 1915, of the 
Ownership, Management, etc., of 

THE 
INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 

(Published Monthly at New York, N. Y.) 

required by the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Editors : 
CHARLES HOLME, European Editor, 44 Leicester Square, London, Eng. 
W. H. de B. NELSON, American Editor, 120 W. 32d St., New York, N. Y. 

Managing Editor: W. H. de B. NELSON, 120 W. 32d St., New York, N. Y. 
Business Manager: RALPH W. CAREY, 120 W. 32d St., New York, N. Y. 
Publisher: JOHN LANE CO., 120 W. 32d St., New York, N. Y. 

Owners: 

JOHN LANE COMPANY 

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RUTGER B. JEWETT 35 W. 32d St., New York, N. Y. 

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Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security holders, holding 1 per cent. 
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages and other securities: 

NONE (signed) RALPH W. CAREY, 

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Sworn to and subscribed before me the 30th day of March. J915- 
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N. Y. Co. No. 3545; N. Y. Register No. 6074. (Commission expires 
March 30, 1916.) 




A> 



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social sophistication 
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77Y£ INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 




ATSKILL MOUNTAINS 



SEASON OF 1915 

Artists have a quick eye for pictur- 
esque and romantic scenery. The 
C ATSKILL MOUNTAINS are their 
Mecca every summer. The glorious 
air, the magnificent views and the 
comfortable accommodation at rea- 

* 

sonable prices are a great attraction. 
Plan for a month at least in this 
favored region! 

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June, iqi 5 



UT( II ART AT THE PANAMA 
EXHIBITION 

Visitors to the Palace of Fine Arts at 
the Panama- Pacific International Exposi- 
tion are apt to overlook the fact that the 
collection of two hundred paintings con- 
tributed by the Netherlands have been 
installed in the extreme north wing and 
are now ready for inspection. 

The main entrance to t he palace does not 
at present connect with the north end of 
the building, owing to installation work 
still in progress in the intervening rooms. 
For this reason main- visitors have over- 
looked the opportunity offered by the 
Netherlands. Access is to be had through 
an outside door immediately south of the 
Netherlands Pavilion. 

This collection embraces much that is 
progressive in Dutch art. It is immedi- 
ately apparent that Dutch painters are 
close to the soil in their sympathies; their 
subjects are intensely human and usually 
simple, and the sturdy strength of their 
work is in sharp contrast to the over- 
temperamental products of some of the 
other artists in the main galleries of the 
building. The list of subjects includ- 
such titles as Mother and Child, To the Mill, 
Old Woman, Katwyk Fisherwoman, Cart 
for the Conveyance of Stones. 

The installation has been completed 
under the direction of Willem Witsen, com- 
missioner of fine arts from the Netherland 
and G. E. De Vries, assistant commi> 
sioner. H. A. Van Cocnen Torchiana is 
commissioner-general. 

Three rooms at present are now open to 
the public. A fourth is in process of prep- 
aration. 

The colour scheme and furnishings of I he 

Dutch galleries are in quiet good taste 
while attractively upholstered settees in 
the rooms give the visitor the opportuni 
to view the collection in comfort. 



M 



USEUM CLASSES FOR CHIL- 
DREN 



The School Art League of New York 
City is actively promoting cooperation be- 
tween the city museums and the elemen- 
tary class rooms. Part of this campaign is 
conducted by means of a docent, who tak 
classes to the museum each afternoon. 
Part is developed as a series of talks f< 
children in the museum halls. 

Under the direction of Dr. James P. 
Haney, director of art in the high school 
a number of different courses have been 
arranged for the little folk. Dr. Haney, 
himself, described his methods at the Con- 
vention of American Federation of An 
which was held in Washington May 12, 1 
and 14. 

On the morning of May 13 Dr. Haney 
briefly reviewed several of his lessons given 
to the large audiences of children which 
flock to the Metropolitan Museum and to 
the Brooklyn Institute Museum whenever 
he is scheduled to appear. In illustration 
of his method, he presented in condensed 
form talks on "Armour," "Architecture," 
"Sculpture," and "Pictures." Drawings 
are always made before the audiences of 
children in connection with each talk. 
These are also supplemented by lantern 
slides, and very frequently several ot the 
audience are invited to assist in the per 

formance by posing for the speaker while 
he sketches. 



June, 1915 



In discussing his method, Dr. Haney 
said recently: "The great object of these 
talks for public school pupils is to get them 
used to coming to the museum — to give 
them, if you like, t he ' museum habit.' No 
tickets are required and the children come 
unaccompanied by parents or teachers. 
Their behavior is admirable, and from 
questions asked of them during the recent 
course, it is plain that there is a constant 
growth of interest on their part in the 
museum and its treasures. 

"These talks are called 'Hero Tales,' 
and are made to gather round the name of 
some knight, king or craftsman, but the 
purpose of telling them is much more than 
the telling of a bit of biography. The hero 
of the story is only a peg on which is hung 
much that deals with the art of the time. 
What one tries to build up in the minds of 
the children is what may be called 'an 
aesthetic background,' against which they 
may set the objects of art found in the 
museum galleries. Into this aesthetic 
background goes some history, some biog- 
raphy, some art. Altogether it serves to 
make the man and his time alive to the 
small hearers. They then see his picture, 
his sculpture, or his craft-work, not as a 
lifeless museum 'specimen,' but as a work 
of art, to create which a man, known to 
them, once toiled and dreamed and 
aspired." 

The officers of the School Art League 
report that during the last year the audi- 
ences of pupils aggregated over 12,000 at 
the various meetings held by the League 
for the children. 



RT MATERIAL EXHIBITION 
IN CHICAGO 

DURING the weeks of July 12 to 26, the 
Chicago Academy of Fine Arts will con- 
duct a central Public School Art Material 
Fair or Exhibition in its studios, at which 
will be shown, so far as space will permit, 
all the standard and new materials, books 
and equipment that are suitable for sup- 
plying the graphic, manual, domestic and 
vocational arts departments of public and 
private schools. 

There will be daily change of morning 
lectures on general art methods subjects 
by Carl N. Werntz, similar to successful 
courses carried on during the past four 
years. Afternoons will be devoted to 
practical talks by representatives of ex- 
hibitors. There will be concerts, enter- 
tainments and excursions. The whole will 
constitute a centrally located Chautauqua 
or exposition where teachers, supervisors 
and principals may get the newest ideas 
and where dealers may show and explain 
their appropriate materials and their 
proper use and appreciation. 

The exhibits will be installed in large, 
well-lighted studios adjoining the large 
lecture room and arrangements may be 
made for whole rooms or small booths. 
The expense is shared by each exhibitor. 

All teachers in Chicago for any purpose 
during this time are invited to avail them- 
selves of an opportunity at least to visit 
the exhibition. This will give an excellent 
opportunity for supervisors and principals 
to see the new materials just before they 
are making out their orders for the season, 
at a time of the year when it is impossible 

to see them in their own cities. 



THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



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THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIO 



June, 1915 



THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK ON THE 

WAR PUBLISHED TO DATE 



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RUSSIAN REALITIES 



Being Impressions Gathered During Some Recent 
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AN EMPEROR IN THE DOCK 



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By Vere Shortt. 12mo. Cloth. $1.25 net. 

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JOHN LANE COMPANY, NEW YORK 






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By the Author of "The Fortunate Youth," 
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12mo. Cloth. $1.30 



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JOHN LANE COMPANY, NEW YORK 



PRESS OF REDFIELD BROTHERS, INC., NEW YORK 



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COPYRIGHT 1915 



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